Writing That Gets Read.

What I miss most about the world of today’s adver­tising is the eye‐catching, thought provoking Head­lines of the Golden Age.
I guess, Volk­swagen started a lot of it with one word, Lemon.
I am enclosing some ads here that I feel are exam­ples of what seems to be missing. My ego won’t allow me to tell you who wrote these ads but I will acknowl­edge the Art Direc­tors and Photog­ra­phers who played a big part in helping me create them.

Agency: McCann Erickson (San Fran­cisco)
1 Del Monte — Art Director: Jon Hyde; Photog­ra­pher: Ed Zak
2 YOSEMITE — Art director: Jon Hyde, Photog­ra­pher: John Muir
3 AIRPORT HILTON — Art Director: Jerry Leon­hart; Illus­trator: Chris Corey
4 SKIING AT YOSEMITE — Art Director: Jon Hyde; Illus­trator: Larry Duke
5 McNevin Cadillac — Art Director: Bruce Camp­bell
6 THINK. DON’T DRINK. — Art Director: Jon Hyde

Another quick tale:
I once did a B.A.R.T. poster for Master­Card and the head­line said;
Bay Area Rapid Trans­ac­tion.

Bart Poster

Adver­tiser: Master­Charge – San Fran­cisco
Adver­tising Mgr.: Rick Wynne
Agency: Foote, Cone & Belding / Honig – San Fran­cisco
Art Director: Kris English

It took up a wall in the BART stations. It won an Award so I asked photog­ra­pher Ed Zak for a copy of the poster. In typical Ed Zak style he said he would have to charge me $25. to make a copy. Zak was one of a kind.

Oh yeah…sure…put that photo in.
It’s the first one I’ve liked in about 20 years.

Todd Miller

Steve Rustad Has Tales To Tell

Steve Rustad Has Tales To Tell & Also Great Advice For A Young Illustrator (And For The June Graduate)!

Steve writes:
I'm "still in the game." And will continue to be until the pry my Cintiq tablet from my cold, dead hands.

Regarding my ad days. Because I preceded by stint in advertising working educational films, most of what I did in the agencies were TV spots. At J. Walter Thompson and I worked under Mac Churchill who (I thought) was a certifiable genius. And a true Mad Man, though his roots were in the Chicago ad scene. Mac's legendary lunch regimen was a flock of double vodka martinis. The effects of which were never apparent in the afternoon - unlike most of the other JWT management at the time. (My opinion, don't quote me.) I'm not sure that my agency story is all that unique, or interesting. It was a crappy time for agencies in general, perhaps because it was the run-up to the agency merger frenzy of the 1980's fueled by the Brits, which I believe drove a stake into the heart of creative advertising. Unlike most creative managers of my acquaintance I worked very hard to support and promote my creative teams which earned me (for the most part) their undying contempt. As for the advertising luminaries that I encountered back then (Riney, Jay Chiat, Bob Hulme. Mike Koelker, Rich Silverstein, etc.) I'm sure I left no lasting impression.

I did these while at Ketchum in the late 70's working under Bruce Campbell:

Channing Kitty Litter

Tony Randall Hunts

Earl Brown Mattel

Duraflame 1979

I didn't do this spot, but I was responsible for animated Safeway tag the chain used for a period in the late 70's.

Safeway 1979

At JWT I worked on Hewlett Packard, Chevron, Dole and a bunch of other brands, but this is only spot (other than the one below) I could find on YouTube.

HP Touch screen

HP Touch screen

For Sea Galley seafood restaurants the legendary (in my mind, anyway) Mac Churchill came up with this concept when we were on a break from presenting failed ideas to the so-far unhappy client.

We've got crab legs

We've got crab legs

I also did some print at JWT. I've attached some ads for Chevron and Dole and Hewlett Packard.

About a decade before I worked in advertising, I was a Federal Sky Marshal guarding flights out of SFO to points west, e.g., the Far East.

This photo shows me in the uniform of a US Customs Security Officer - my official job when I wasn't flying undercover.

Fast forward to 2007 I decided to recount some of my "adventures" in a blog, which I continued to post content to, on and off, for the next 5 years.

If you like, please check it out, click here Sky Marshal Story - Night Flight to SFO - #31
As a Sky Marshal (aka Air Marshal) assigned to PanAm from early 1971 to the fall of 1972, I conducted most of my in-flight security duties aboard the Boeing 747. At the time, I didn’t realize how revolutionary the 747 was.??The 60’s boom in air travel had created a major traffic jam at the country’s airports as the 707’s and Douglas DC8’s jostled for space at the jet ways. As a remedy, Juan Trippe, Panama’s legendary Founder and President, pushed Boeing to create a plane at least twice the size of the 707. In response Boeing produced the 747-100 or Jumbo Jet. It’s said that PanAm's influence as a “launch customer,” and the company’s hand in the design even before they placed their formal order, allowed Trippe to influence the development of the 747 in ways never seen before or since in the history of commercial aircraft. PanAm inaugurated 747 Jumbo Jet service in 1970. At 2.5 times the size of a 707, the wide body featured eight-across seating. The cockpit was on an upper deck, behind which was a “lounge,” for lack of a better word. The upped deck was accessed by a circular staircase – really a curved ladder – that looked like it had been yanked out of in artist’s studio in Soho. The powers-that-were decided to increase the teams of Sky Marshals assigned to 747 to three members, whereas 707’s and other “narrow-body” craft warranted teams of two. Usually two Marshals sat in First Class. The poor sap who drew the short straw sat way in the back of the cabin. Of the two Marshals who got to mingle with the carriage trade in First Class, one was required to sit at the foot of the spiral staircase. Since there were no assigned seats in the upper deck lounge we couldn’t position ourselves up there without blowing “our cover.” Yet, protocol required that no passenger was to visit the lounge without a Sky Marshal to keep him or her company. Any passenger who was hip to that knew exactly who was following them up the stairs. Most of flights I guarded over my tour of duty were a half to three-quarters full and – at least in first class – that left ample room to stretch your legs. However, I remember one flight where the increased capacity of the 747 was put to the test. The flight to SFO lifted off from Haneda Airport in Tokyo sometime after 10PM packed to the gills with men, women, children and babies. The cabin of the plane felt like a subway at rush hour. As a Sky Marshal, I’d never worked a flight where every seat was full. For the first half dozen hours everything was pretty normal. It was late, the cabin lights were dim and most of the passengers were snoozing. But as the evening dissolved into morning and folks began to stir, they did what most folks to when the first wake up…they went to the bathroom. Had they chosen to space the visits out, the plumbing might have handled the onslaught, but it seemed like everyone went, or wanted to go, all at the same time. In short order, the bathrooms began to fail, one after the other, until two long lines of fidgety passengers packed the two aisles leading to the last functioning bathroom in the back of Coach. It was so congested that the Marshal who had been positioned in the back had to work his way forward to the central galley just so that he could have some freedom of movement. Though the First Class bathrooms remained functional, airline rules forbade passengers from migrating past the bulkhead that separated the two sections. Then a woman with a sick baby burst through the curtains and headed for one of the First Class bathrooms with such fierce intention that she was virtually dragging in her wake the near-hysterical stewardess who had been trying in vain to explain the rules to her. Well, the sight of this determined woman breaching the sacred curtain of First Class broke the dam, as it were. Soon the aisles in First Class were also jammed with folks hopping from one to foot to the other. In the beginning, none of the Coach passengers who had stormed the bastion of privilege were aware of the bathroom on the upper deck but I knew it would be only a matter of time. Since the door to the upper deck bathroom was directly adjacent to the cockpit door, a scrum of passengers clustered in the upper deck lounge presented a security nightmare so I decamped from my seat at the base of the staircase to the lounge where I sacrificed my cover to spend the remainder of the flight standing sentry-like in front of the cockpit door. Interestingly, not one person that night asked me if I was a Sky Marshal.

© Stephen Rustad, 2008

These days, I’m working mostly in social media for a national food company. We have a sub-brand of sorts, Spoiled To Perfection (a video series) that discusses Fermented Foods, a hot topic among both foodies and Millennials This episode (from 2016) features some local (Sonoma County) talent in brewing:

When I have time I blog on my Rustad Marketing website (www.rustadmarketing.com) about topics I think might be relevant to folks interested in contemporary advertising issues and trends. Here’s one I wrote after a dinner with my daughter, who was soon to graduate from college and was fretting about her future.

Advice for A Young Illustrator
Some years ago, I had dinner with my daughter who, in my expert* opinion, is an exceptionally talented illustrator. After dessert, she confessed to me her concern that there wasn’t a place for her in the world of professional illustrators. I remember feeling exactly the same way when I graduated from college, nearly 50 years ago, and faced a bleak job market. Looking back over a professional career that has spanned more than 45 years (and counting), I want to offer my daughter, and others like her, some wisdom about seeking a career in what seems to be an overcrowded field with no obvious points of entry.

When I was first making the rounds as a young man entering the work world I received a profound tip about job hunting that proved to be true for me and many others: There is always a place for someone with talent, intelligence, a desire to work hard and – most important of all – a fresh approach to his or her craft.

Other qualities define my daughter: she has an unquenchable passion to create art of all kinds, and her work sparkles with intelligence, wit and a unique style. Coupled with her talent, these qualities complete the trifecta necessary to succeed as an illustrator.
So, how does my daughter and others like her find a place in a world crowded with talented, hardworking young men and women?

To begin, everyone who wants to sell their services, whether as a freelancer or a prospective employee, needs to view themselves from the point of view of the consumer. This is exactly the same advice I give to any marketer of a product or service.  Don’t make the mistake of viewing the world from inside the bubble of self-awareness. In politics, this is called the echo chamber where all you hear is what you say. Businesses who behave this way are, “legends within their own walls.”

Any honest marketing effort starts by facing the hard truth that the great majority of potential customers don’t know who you are, and aren’t looking for you. Few people walk around thinking to themselves, “Who don’t I know that I should know”. The purpose of marketing is to change this. For the sake of simplicity I’ve boiled marketing communications down to three essential, sequential, components: awareness, relevance and action.

Awareness, means that as many people as possible, not just potential customers, have to encounter a memorable message about you. For a young person just starting out, awareness begins with friends and family – sharing projects and samples through broad reach social media such Tumblr, Facebook, YouTube, Pinterest and Instagram. A website is essential, and platforms such as Squarespace are virtually free.

Relevance, that is establishing a connection with a potential customer or employer, is achieved by populating your website and social media with projects and concepts that reflect current culture, trends, activities and passions – yours as well as others.  Popular topics such as food, fashion, travel, movies and technology provide ample opportunity to demonstrate your intelligence, humor and creativity.

Action, which can range from a prospect or customer returning a message to offering a job, is the result of effective marketing. Common factors that lead to action – assuming that awareness and relevance have been established – are passion, preparation and persistence. Of course, you can’t discount luck. Still, as the saying goes, “Fortune favors the prepared.” One reason this maxim rings true is because two crucial elements of preparation are passion and persistence. (A voice from the back of room heckles, “What about quality, expertise, experience and skill?” In the service of brevity, let’s agree that these are all part of preparation, as well.)

Finally – and here’s the clincher – our aspiring artist must clearly demonstrate a unique style. I see many artists who have talent, skill and appear to be hardworking but the portfolios appear interchangeable. Some of this is perhaps the product of working (or aspiring to work) in a “creative factory” (think Disney or Pixar) where a corporate style or “look” influences the art.

To wrap up, perhaps the most direct answer to the question, “Is there a place for me in the world?” is “Yes, once you give people a chance to discover your unique, original, voice.” Before Apple introduced the iPhone no one knew they needed a hand-held, flat-screen monitor that connected to the Internet. Afterwards, they couldn’t live without one.

Daughter Valerie’s book Illustration

If you're interested in knowing more about my daughter, here's the link to her website click here:
Steve Rustad

Painter to Graphics to Painter

Ward Schumaker’s Bio: Painter to Graphics to Painter

By the time I was six I knew I would become a painter. But in 1965, at the age of 22, I entered a compe­ti­tion put on by the governor of Nebraska (my home state) and after judges awarded me first place, the governor went crazy, called my entry “filthy and disgusting” and threat­ened me with pros­e­cu­tion for creating pornog­raphy. I quit painting, moved to Cali­fornia, and became a paper salesman.

And I might have remained a paper salesman my whole long life except that I also became a father. How could I tell my son I was a paper salesman? Not that there’s anything wrong with that — unless you real­ized you’d been created to paint. So, without knowing anything about design, I started doing paste‐ups for designers (Fetzer‐Conover) and ended up working for Snoopy at Deter­mined Produc­tions.

In 1978, 35 years old, I quit. I rented a desk from Corpo­rate Graphics and began illus­trating.

Rapi­do­graph dots was my specialty and on my first day out, I got my first edito­rial work: Rich Silver­stein at San Fran­cisco Maga­zine: 40 hours, $40; as well as the cover of Coppola’s City maga­zine: same price. The next week Mik Kiti­gawa gave me my first commer­cial job (a jug of milk): 40 hours, $1000. This seemed pretty good! It was not quite what I wanted to do, not my taste, but it sure beat paper sales.

Seven years later Linda Hinrichs asked me to do draw­ings for Dole Mush­rooms; she wanted them done in pencil and done loosely, like a sketch book: right up my alley! From then on I kept getting work closer and closer to my desires. FedEx­press arrived, enabling me to work on the East Coast; then emails opened up Europe and Japan. I began creating illus­tra­tions for the NYTimes, Gourmet, the Boston Globe; as well as Le Figaro, Hermès and Playboy Japan.

Note: Above is *my personal collec­tion of Ward Schumaker’s early art styles (which I gath­ered and saved as I followed Ward’s successful entry into San Francisco’s graphic commu­nity. Some of these show their age and I have noted the years that they appeared in publi­ca­tions here in the San Fran­cisco Bay region. The years show at the bottom of each image when they were published. (Self‐promotions of the1970s and assign­ments from 1982 to 2008.)

Ward has said that he is surprised that I have this small collec­tion (of his exten­sive early work). I met Ward as he called on our art studio, repre­senting Carpenter‐Offutt Paper and as he started creating commer­cial art, I became a fan of his unlim­ited orig­inal styles.

Ann Thompson


Ward Schu­maker:
Illus­tra­tions

1-adam.eve.snake: illus­tra­tion for book, God’s Femur. Client: S F Center for the Book
2‐asleep: illus­tra­tion for book, The Art of Being a Woman. Client: Potter
3-au.chat.agile: illus­tra­tion for book Two Kitchens in Provence. Client: Yolla Bolly Press
4-Bark.Magazine: illus­tra­tion for article on dogs. Client: Bark Maga­zine
5​-black​.dance: cover illus­tra­tion for Date­book. Client: San Fran­cisco Chron­icle
6‐charitybiz: cover of book, Charity Biz. Client: Payot
7‐circus: cover of book, Sing a Song of Circus. Client: Chron­icle Books
8-columbus.bakery: logo for bakery café. Client: Columbus Bakery
9-Dix.Jours: cover for book, Dix Jours dans Les Collines. Client: Rivages
10-esquire.japan: cover for maga­zine featuring Northern Cali­fornia. Client: Esquire Japan
11-hemispheres.cover: cover for inflight maga­zine. Client: United Airlines
12‐hermes: catalog for the press. Client: Hermès
13​-in​.my​.garden: cover of Japanese children’s book, In My Garden. Client: Chron­icle Books
14-Japanese.Cultural: illus­tra­tion for brochure. Client: S F Japanese Cultural Center
15‐lagom: card­board callig­raphy. Client: Afar Maga­zine
16‐mooses_cups: logo for San Fran­cisco restau­rant. Client: Moose’s restau­rant
17-paris.bouge: callig­raphy for maga­zine cover. Client: Le Figaro
18‐reading_cat: illus­tra­tion for book­mark. Client: S F Center for the Book
19‐sfchronicle_anniv: calli­graphic illus­tra­tion for cover of the Date­book. Client: S F Chron­icle
20‐shrek: calli­graphic illus­tra­tion for Broadway play. Client: Spotco
21-wash.post.nixon: illus­tra­tion for maga­zine. Client: Wash­ington Post

Around year 2000 my then new wife suggested I return to painting and now that’s all I do.

You’re invited to visit my current show at Jack Fischer Gallery in San Fran­cisco at 16th and Potrero (until 11 May): Spyder Gears + Iden­tity Maps. Link to: Jack Fischer Gallery Exhi­bi­tion

Much of my fine art consists of large hand‐painted books with hand‐cut sten­ciled typog­raphy and recently a trade version of one – – an anti‐Trump book called Hate Is What We Need – – was published by Chron­icle Books. Buy it on Amazon or Chronicle’s website.

My wife, Vivi­enne Flesher, will be showing at Jack Fischer Gallery’s Minnesota Street Project venue, with an opening 01 June. I’d love to see you there! And my son is now a Martin Luther King, Jr., Visiting Scholar at M.I.T. He creates extra­or­di­nary, amazing computer music. I’m so proud of both of them. And at 76 years old, they make me realize what a fortu­nate guy I’ve been.

Ward Schu­maker

Come Visit my website and see what’s new.

POP and POS

In the years shown here, “Point Of Purchase” and “Point Of Sale” were the terms to describe the many items that made prod­ucts appealing, (Today the term: Point Of Sale or POS is widely defined as the process of purchasing the product or service.)

In the years of 1970 to 1975, I was able to touch on this area of marketing. From label and product designs to the promo pieces that brought atten­tion to the product in a store setting. These assign­ments gave me a sense of being there, greeting the customers. (I was young.)

The A. Carlisle & Co. of San Fran­cisco had the printing and construc­tion equip­ment to develop a variety of store displays. Carlisle’s creative direc­tors gave me — twelve assign­ments. Here are some exam­ples:

Shasta: In 1889 “Shasta” was known for the waters from the Mt. Shasta, CA region.

In the years after 1931 it was devel­oped into a ginger ale or soda and they were offered usually as a mix for alco­holic drinks. In the 1950s Shasta Cola became avail­able in cans. Oper­ating from their head­quar­ters in Hayward CA, the Shasta company was a nearby client for adver­tising assign­ments.

1970 Shasta Cola, Shelf‐Talker. This was an unusual idea at that time – opaque inks printed on foil, with a die‐cut. This was to show along with the Shasta Cola displayed on the market shelf.

C&H Sugar: (Cali­fornia and Hawaiian Sugar Company) As early as 1906, ships from Hawaii were sailing into San Fran­cisco Bay, then north­east through San Pablo Bay reaching the port of Crockett where they offloaded raw cane sugar. C&H today, produces 700,000 tons of sugar annu­ally. C&H was a steady client for San Fran­cisco ad agen­cies and printing compa­nies.

1971 C&H Sugar Hawaii (3‐D wire hangers). Here the request was to have two “Wire‐Hangers” with two different scenes on each side (one showing daytime and the other side, night­time. Also there was a banner with the words: “LUAU LAND

1972 C&H Sugar (Wire Hangers). I first tried other rough ideas: an egg and bunny as a folded die‐cut in an egg shape – – a little bunny – – a chicken – – then two layouts preceded the final five wire‐hangers.

1973-Elec­tric & Gas Indus­tries Asso­ci­a­tionEIGA. Orig­i­nally head­quar­tered in San Fran­cisco, with roots from the early 1930s, EGIA began as a nonprofit member­ship asso­ci­a­tion with the mission to help promote the sale of energy‐efficient appli­ances for retailers throughout the state of Cali­fornia. EIGA is now located in Sacra­mento, CA.

1973: Clorox’s Liquid‐plumr

Liquid‐plumr” made by Clorox with head­quar­ters in Oakland CA, was another regional client. Not having a color Xerox in those years, I show these four exam­ples in b/w. The one chosen was to be rendered as finished art, printed and then placed in markets near the product.

The large wine industry in Cali­fornia gave the Carlisle Company many oppor­tu­ni­ties of displaying a variety of displays and bins that would hold many bottles and have photographs portraying an elegant display of the wines.

1973: Inglenook wine was founded in Ruther­ford, Cali­fornia during 1879 by Gustave Niebaum, a Finnish sea captain.

This Inglenook page of layouts offered the client a choice of photo­graphic settings. The clients would choose the mood that they wanted displayed and a photog­ra­pher would follow the basic “look” and be the one to choose all of the elements for the “table‐top” setting. The chosen “look” is shown also.

1973: Chilean Wines. Carlisle’s client, here, might have been a company dealing mostly with wines imported into San Fran­cisco Bay. It might have been the begin­ning of the San Fran­cisco Wine Trading Company. (I have no other source.) For this assign­ment, we offered many choices of subjects for the “feel” of a Chilean vine­yard. Two of the subjects were devel­oped.

1973: One of California’s oldest and most renowned wineries, Geyser Peak Winery was founded in 1880 by Augustus Quitzow, a pioneer in Alexander Valley wine­making,

1974: POP concepts for imported BABYSHAM.

1973 – 1974: Anna­corré. I don’t have notes on this display sheet as to who brought this job to us, nor the name of the parent winery. I cannot find any infor­ma­tion about this wine, on line.

United Vint­ners Starting in 1975 I got a number of assign­ments from United Vint­ners, usually through ad agen­cies such as McCann Erickson. Some assign­ments were also for maga­zine ads, and posters for Guild Brandy. A “warm‐up” jacket was offered.

How many ways can you offer a wood wine‐rack for $22.00?

For Inglenook, these b&w copies were Magic Marker color sketches to show eleven ways to make that offer on their in‐store display bins.

This other (folded) display layout was to be placed behind a collec­tion of Inglenook bottles.

United Vint­ners, in those days, also had the three TJ Swann ($1.75) fruit wines: Easy Nights, Mellow Days, and After Hours. These are no longer avail­able in markets. This “Dial a Wine” was to be attached to the refrig­er­ated cases that held these wines. The turn of the dial to 15 descrip­tive sentences, would offer the suggested fruit wine for each occa­sion!

This was one of three strange assign­ments, so far in my career. (The first was the pack­aging of meal­worms for fishing. (“Mighty Mealys” was a previous story.) The other was for a J. Walter Thompson client: Shakey’s Pizza. They planned a Christmas P.O.P. poster showing a slice of pizza with the Shakey’s logo as the star on the top. 7‐Up was an addi­tional product to show – so bottle caps were orna­ments and the 7‐Up bottle was the trunk of the tree. (I’ve tried to forget that assign­ment.)

Browne Vint­ners

Paul Masson (1859 – 1940) emigrated from Burgundy, France to Cali­fornia in 1878. In 1892 he devel­oped his first sparkling wine. Masson even­tu­ally became known as the “Cham­pagne King of Cali­fornia”.

Late 1970s: David Reid, creative director at Browne Vint­ners, planned that this poster for Paul Masson wines to be, actu­ally, a P.O.P.!

The artist, Dick Moore, said that it was offered FREE– as a “tear‐off‐sheet”.

ADASF 1958 – 1971

Here is a collec­tion of designs accepted in the annual exhi­bi­tions of the Art Direc­tors and Artists Club of San Fran­cisco. Point Of Purchase aka: Point Of Sale.

One might ques­tion how a large outdoor board could be a point of sale. The two “OK” boards, in the ‘70s, were place at the side of the large Chevrolet lots selling “OK” approved used cars. Too bad, that the annuals were only in black and white. (I had one color example, so I added it.

The many San Fran­cisco Bay Area graphic artists and art studios — had steady sources of employ­ment. Reviewing all of these exam­ples from the few years shown, I wonder how the POP industry is oper­ating now. Do artists still have the freedom to develop and render various choices for the client, printing shops, or ad agen­cies – – still with markers or what?

Ann Thompson

An Apple For The Artist

Long before an Apple Computer became one of my art tools, I was asked to create Illus­tra­tions “the old fash­ioned way” for the Apple IIGS Owner’s Guide (manuals are no longer offered).
Apple’s Macin­tosh had been intro­duced in 1984, yet the Apple II series of computers continued for about ten more years. When I was awarded the job on 82685 my finished artwork was still accom­plished with illus­tra­tion boards, pens, brushes and inks. At that same time, I had my free­lance and agency‐in‐house artist space in the Vicom Associate’s offices on Battery Street in San Fran­cisco.

There were a couple of meet­ings with Apple, when I would drive down to Cuper­tino to plan an art style and page design and also deter­mine my price for the job. Trans­lating copy to art for Apple Computer’s IIGS manual, I was asked to keep my spots “light‐hearted”. Every­thing devel­oped smoothly and when I needed the accu­racy of depicting the four Apple computers avail­able those days, I turned to Richard Moore (free­lancing from our home) to compose and create the finished detailed art of the four existing line of Apple II computers.

Apple IIGS Owner’s Guide. 1986, Apple Computer, Inc.
Concepts and Illus­tra­tions: Ann Thompson, Art Direc­tion: Molly Tyson; addi­tional product illus­tra­tions: Dick Moore.

Soon, more Apple II Guides were needed, but my orig­inal agency accounts in SF needed me. My contacts in Cuper­tino asked me “Are there any more like you at home?” and I said, “Yes” and Richard Moore completed several more manuals for them. Apple was glad that Richard set us up at home with an Apple IICX –$16,000 (at that time) including printer, scanner, (the works)! Richard’s Apple illus­tra­tions for the manuals were, for the first time, created with an Apple computer!

The Macin­tosh, A Better Apple Was Presented.

Apple’s Macin­tosh computers were being intro­duced and soon set up in Vicom Asso­ciates’ art depart­ment. At one point, the agency wanted to test the Macintosh’s abil­i­ties against my usual methods of making the large, 24” X 36” — presen­ta­tion boards for the agency’s meet­ings with their various clients. The require­ments: –quality of message and speed — I won, achieving both require­ments!

The art depart­ment could only print letter‐sized prints from their Macs. The crew in the art depart­ment had to (1‐search and choose from the limited choices of clip‐art, (2‐compose the type, boxes, arrows and images, (3‐print out the docu­ment, (4‐send it out to a copy shop to make a Photo­stat up to display size and then (5‐wait for the b/w print and when it arrived, spray‐mount it to a foam core board. I had the benefit of 1 sheet of large layout paper, full color (markers and pencils) and I could compose unlim­ited subjects. I often had to work through the night on those display boards that were to fly in the morning to an early meeting on the east coast. (Using the Mac, the agency would have had to keep the art crew and copy shop into the night.) My boards became known in this agency as “Annie‐Boards”! When one of our art direc­tors moved to another adver­tising agency, she, out of habit, asked for “Annie‐ Boards” to be made.”Animatics”?, “anima­tion?”, her co‐workers asked. She said that she had to describe my boards.
(Note: I don’t have the exact example from the compe­ti­tion, because it was shown at the planned client meeting.)

There were times that I could have asked for a Mac in my room in the agency, but there were young and eager hires ready to sit there with and art director over their shoulder, and I knew that I’d get into it on my own at home. When I did, we had an AppleIICX at home. My abil­i­ties grew as each new graphic soft­ware program became avail­able. I exper­i­mented with all kinds of subject, yet I would keep trying subjects needed for my agency assign­ments.
With the earlier computers and drawing programs, drawing with a “mouse” (like a small brick) it seemed not to matter if I was left or right‐handed. The very early computer line art had the large pixels. “Studio 8” offered a lot to the graphic artist, but the edges were still very rough. The Mac and the two Adobe programs: Photo­shop and Illus­trator offered a huge range of different qual­i­ties for different needs. These show the improve­ment of the graphic programs and my improve­ment using them.

Personal Exper­i­mental:

Job Subjects:

Ten Second Manager
Around the mid ‘90s I received many assign­ments for Apple Univer­sity (internal teaching publi­ca­tions). One assign­ment from Apple Univer­sity was a pocket‐sized hand­book for employees — the style of the illus­tra­tions was to be “more humorous”. Following the copy that was written for the pocket sized hand­book, 23 humorous illus­tra­tions were accepted.

Apple Univer­sity – The Ten‐Second Manager. 1996, Apple Computer, Inc.,
Copy: Molly Tyson, Design and Illus­tra­tions: Ann Thompson, Evan­ge­lism: Sherri Rose, Produc­tion & Moral Support: Ken Freehan

Internal Home­page: Apple Univer­sity
The first meet­ings were with the title, “The Art of Manage­ment”. Many more page arrange­ments brought us to the next sketch that you see with the title “Apple Univer­sity”. The final design is shown here on Netscape, the web browser of that time.

Leader’s Lounge” was a link from the Home­page. The high­lighted objects in the Lounge were “links” to addi­tional pages with more written infor­ma­tion.

Apple University’s Catalog of Services

Forty pages plus cover with 15 illus­tra­tions (mostly of them repeated from the Ten Second Manager.

These assign­ments, above, for Apple Univer­sity were my favorites because of the amount of creative freedom they gave to me. The Mac became my favorite art tool. I’m on our iMac, now.

Ann Thompson