Illustrating, But Not For Public Viewing

I was working for phar­ma­ceu­tical adver­tising agen­cies, and in those years, very little reached the public. Most of the promo­tional work and exhibits for trade shows were addressed only to the medical commu­nity. The goal was to intro­duce the merits of a product by personal inter­views with doctors and their medical teams. The Product Repre­sen­ta­tive made the contacts directly with the doctors. Our agency’s promo­tional team provided all of the details of the product for the doctor to know — so he/she could suggest the product, and person­ally inform a patient of its use.

This was before the phar­ma­ceu­tical compa­nies began selling directly to the public through print and live action ads in the media. The public has become aware of various phar­ma­ceu­tical prod­ucts shown in printed ads or presented in a few minutes in TV spots. Some viewers then feel, that they know what they need. With the cost of public adver­tising in every type of media, the price of the prod­ucts climbed. In some other advanced coun­tries — if a medica­tion needs a physician’s written prescrip­tion — then adver­tising that product is not allowed.
Looking back, there seemed to be a lot of time and money spent to aid the product rep for each meeting, but compared to the medical industry today these campaigns were small and simple.
So here are some campaigns from those early days when the doctor was the phar­ma­ceu­tical company’s main customer.

Working for the agency’s clients, several prod­ucts were created: folders, medical journal ads, promo­tional presen­ta­tions and campaign concepts. Each needed the image of a doctor, a white doctor. To simplify, a doctor was a man and a nurse was a woman. Only a group of medical workers or group of patients could show a mixture of genders, races and ages.

Presen­ta­tions to doctors, medical teams and clinics — were made with slide shows. They were timed to the script on an audio­cas­sette. (Video presen­ta­tions did not exist, yet.) A large amount of slides were needed. Here is the collec­tion (from March of 1977) of 72 slides that took 75 hours for me to accom­plish. The camera-ready art was needed for the launch of Syntex’s Brevicon birth control pill.

Also I show just some of the 40 slides for CIBA (early 1990s) — with the doctor in his white coat. This series (and the following two) were accom­plished with a fine point felt pen and various brands of markers. This left me with no possi­bility to correct any error or bad color choice. If I made a mistake, the frame would have to be drawn and colored again. This was a bit stressful but I found the method a quick way to produce the art for slides that were to be seen very quickly.

This next slide presen­ta­tion was an addi­tion to a campaign theme, “FOOD FOR THOUGHT”. The folders of printed product infor­ma­tion (that I show below) intro­duced the slide presen­ta­tion. A b/w story­board planned the images with the script.

The presen­ta­tion was directed to the medical specialist, the derma­tol­o­gist. He would have known the differ­ences in the two skin medica­tions: Syntex’s LIDEX and Syntex’s SYNEMOL.

The art for these 71 slides took me 82 hours to render. The two doctors, older white men, were created to suggest that they had equal stature of their estab­lished prac­tices to make their compar­ison look balanced — yet each physi­cian GP or Derm (general prac­ti­tioner or derma­tol­o­gist) were explained to be very different.
My draw­ings show that the Derm doctor owns an expen­sive car and also he is a member of a men’s club— suggesting his finan­cial success is more than the GP’s. If I would have been told to show the Derm as a female, some other hint of wealth would have been more diffi­cult to visu­ally suggest.
For this next presen­ta­tion for Cutter Labs, we show trees and bees. Other slides with more written messages brought the total number of slides needed, to 20. The year was 1977. Today, even the “anes­the­si­ol­o­gist bee” and the “purchasing agent bee” could’ve been a female.

Pfizer’s 1999 Super hero presen­ta­tion. Zithromax (Azithromycin) is an antibi­otic. It’s widely used to treat chest infec­tions such as pneu­monia, infec­tions of the nose and throat such as sinus infec­tion (sinusitis), skin infec­tions, Lyme disease, and some sexu­ally trans­mitted infections.

I presented the first char­ac­ters in rough sketch to the agency team. I suggested a female rep in addi­tion to Johnny Rep. The Doc is the “super hero.
The only times that there was need to show female doctor (or is she a tech­ni­cian or nurse prac­ti­tioner?) was when the medical subject, this time for public viewing, would be for a female issue.

The last example is a brochure (August 1976 Cutter Medical) that was not for the public — but for a personal, doctor-patient meeting. I could have shown a woman as the doctor but since there were more male doctors in the US, that deter­mined this choice.

The purpose of these quizzes below was for the product repre­sen­ta­tives to view a doctor’s surround­ings to know more about his or her inter­ests. With that, the product rep would be able to create a closer rela­tion­ship. The first card shows the male doctor. The second example — (finally!) a woman is shown as “The Doctor”! Then the third scene shows a lot of females (but in so called “women’s jobs”) and there, in the distance, is the doctor in his office. Today, we might see a man as the recep­tionist, or at a computer. The older woman seems correct, yet the doc could’ve been a woman and the patient, a man.

Lastly, I found this sample (below) of an assign­ment that I had at Vicom Asso­ciates. I couldn’t remember why I was asked to illus­trate a ‘Camp­bell Kid”! (Was it a boy or girl?) So I emailed the creative director from that time — (he now lives in NYC) — to get the answer.

Hi Les,
Now, I am sure that you are not trav­eling the world. So can I ask you (?) was this art for internal use or was it a job? It is on a top-folded card with no message inside.
Ann

His answer:

Hi Ann,
You’ve got quite an archive there! That illus­tra­tion was part of a pitch we did for Campbell’s Soup. That’s a Camp­bell Kid as an MD. We were talking to the company about commu­ni­cating with the health­care sector. It was a pitch in concert with FCB consumer. The busi­ness didn’t happen.
Best, Les

Playing “doctor” — BOY OR GIRL?
And so, regarding the issue about illus­trating a male or
female doctor?

Now, here is a solu­tion — like this Camp­bell Kid,
the gender is in question.

Ann Thompson


Pink Pearl” and More Art Supplies

Pink Pearl Eraser

In the previous post, Bill Stewart’s “Pink Pearl” eraser was there among his art supplies. That brand of eraser was not just an art tool it was used by all. I got curious about its origin and found — the science!
On June 17, 2019, Ray Hahn wrote this: (Search: Bottle Caps and Pink Pearl Erasers)
The Eber­hard Faber Company opened America’s first pencil factory in New York City in 1861 on a plot of land now occu­pied by the United Nations. It is uncer­tain when the eraser was invented, but in general terms, Joseph Priestly (the same man who discov­ered Oxygen) is frequently given credit for the eraser.
The history of the Pink Pearl eraser is much better docu­mented. It was invented in 1848 in Germany when Eber­hard Faber’s grand­fa­ther, Casper, decided that a new method of erasing wayward graphite marks (not, lead) might be achieved by using rubber. Erasers have been an impor­tant piece of writing history, but the pencil and the eraser were at first, two different tools. It was Faber who first added erasers to his pencils and he did so some­time after a new factory was built in the Green­point section of Brooklyn in 1872.
The magic ingre­dient in the Pink Pearl is volcanic ash from Italy. When mixed with rubber, it is the pumice in the ash that gives the eraser its unique smell. Unlike poorly formu­lated erasers that loosen and remove paper fibers, the Pink Pearl erases by cleaning the surface. It is elemen­tary science, which demon­strates that erasers don’t just work manu­ally; they also work chem­i­cally. ?Pencils work because, when they are put to paper, their graphite mingles with the fiber parti­cles in the paper. Erasers work because the poly­mers that are used in manu­fac­turing them are stickier than the parti­cles of paper. It’s that simple, graphite parti­cles end up getting stuck to the eraser instead of the paper. Erasers are liter­ally sticky graphite magnets. (This article appeared in an earlier form in the South Jersey Post­card Club’s McClin­tock Letter of October 2014, page 6.)
And More Art Tools

I have contributed photos of a lot of my old art tools to the “Museum of Lost Art Supplies” as we show in the column on the left under “Places We Like”. This is still a great collec­tion to look over.
Recently with the extra time and a few items still to send in – I found that the site was not respon­sive in accepting addi­tional items. After several attempts, I reached Lou Brooks.

Lou wrote:
Hey, Hi Ann! Sorry it took a while to get back to you. Lots of changes. Clare and I moved to McMin­nville Oregon almost a year ago, and we’re still chasing our own tails to catch up. Now, the CO-VID! But on we all go. My orig­inal provider has made it diffi­cult to get the Museum of Forgotten Art Supplies site to do us much good these days. I value your contribs and friend­ship, Ann, and strongly request you sign up on FB for my Forgotten Art Supplies Forum Pushing 4,000 enthu­si­astic members and climbing. With stellar results… tons of post­ings, and plenty of back and forth helpful dialog. All seem to enjoy it immensely. I enjoy you posts, and would love to see your stuff up there.
Just sign up and I’ll put you right in.
Lou Brooks

I don’t do Face­book but I slipped my collectible into Richard’s FB account —to place these two exam­ples with my written descrip­tion. It went up quickly on the “Forgotten Art Supplies Forum”. I was surprised as I received twelve comments about my submis­sion. Lou Brook’s new Face­book collec­tion shows items that are in addi­tion than those on his previous site.

(We are keeping the orig­inal “Museum” on this site. It is still inter­ac­tive for viewing the exten­sive collec­tions but it doesn’t accept new addi­tions.) Or use this link.

I’ve thought of another subject – the Flo-master felt tip pen and its ink.
This attrac­tive felt-tip pen could be filled and re-filled. It was avail­able before Magic Markers and other markers appeared in art stores.

The beauty of this pen was that I could control the wet or dryness of the strokes to the paper. As you pressed the felt tip a few times to a surface, ink would flow into it. When the felt tip became partially dry, subtle shading was possible. I used it often in life drawing classes and I carried it when sketching outdoors.
This sketch, above, I made on a land­scape sketching field trip in the summer of 1961 – a summer class at the Academy of Art (founded in 1929 by Richard S. Stephens) Mr. Stephens was leading us there on SF’s Tele­graph Hill. At the end of class, all were invited to a coffee shop (where Scoma’s Restau­rant is now) —where “Pappy Stephens” held court.

I mentioned the pen to Bill Stewart and I was surprised that he, too, remem­bered it as a favorite tool.
Bill Stewart wrote:
I was going to send a Pix of a Flo-Master Pen. A pre Magic Marker refill­able felt pen. When I was a student, Robert Fawcett gave a lecture. Of course, everyone wanted to know what he used for his beau­tiful, powerful illus­tra­tions. He said a Flo-master pen. After that, all the art supply stores sold out of Flo-masters. Actu­ally Flo-masters were orig­i­nally intended for use as sign markers in the retail stores. Later, a tool for NYC subway taggers.
Bill

This was my SF office/studio room —with lovely “North light”! (1 Lombard Street, where Battery Street met the Embar­cadero.) On November 6, 1997, I dragged my chairs, drawing board, lamps, two file cabi­nets and all of my art supplies —home.
Art supplies that I was sure I was going to need.
Now, I need to send photos of the last of my collec­tion of art tools— to the “Forgotten Art Supplies Forum”.

Ann Thompson


A Walk Into History

In the mid 1970s to the early ‘80s, I coör­di­nated a very inter­esting docu­men­tary art program for the National Park Service. The program had been going on between the New York Society of Illus­tra­tors and the National Park Service in Wash­ington D.C.
I had received word that they wanted to include a profes­sional art society on the west coast into their program ”Artists In The Parks”.
A ‘Parks’ offi­cial flew out from Wash­ington D.C. to meet me to discuss the program and their needs.
Fortu­nately our Society of Illus­tra­tors was having an annual exhibit in the lobby of the Crown Zeller­bach Building at the same time. After having wined and dined him, I took him to see the illus­tra­tion exhibit. He was very impressed with the caliber of talent in the San Fran­cisco Society of Illus­tra­tors. Two days after he flew back, I received a phone call. We were a part of the program!
The San Fran­cisco illus­tra­tors that chose to travel and create paint­ings for the National Parks Collec­tion were:

1‑Jim Sanford (not shown) 2‑Chris Kenyon 3‑Dave Grove 4‑Earl Thol­lander (not shown) 5‑Norm Nicholson 6‑Suzanne Siminger (not shown) 7‑John Ruther­ford (not shown) 8‑Ray Ward 9‑Bill Shields 10-Dick Cole (not shown) 11-Joe Cleary 12-Ed Diff­end­erfer 13-Robert Bausch (not shown).

I was asked to assign those artists willing to travel and partic­i­pate in the program to a national park or monu­ment in the U.S. Upon their return, an artist would produce one or two paint­ings with complete freedom to express their inter­pre­ta­tion of the park they had visited.
One assign­ment that I had, included trav­eling to Glacier Bay National Monu­ment, Alaska and Klondike National Historic Park in Skagway. Skagway, Alaska, in 1976 was a quiet village and tourism was minimal.
Upon my arrival, in a conver­sa­tion with one of the resi­dents, I told him my purpose for being there. He imme­di­ately suggested an after­noon excur­sion for my wife and me. Our guide offered to take us to a ghost town called Dyea, site of the starting point for the gold prospec­tors in the 1898 Yukon gold rush. We accepted his offer and found ourselves bouncing over and old dirt road for miles in his truck. We climbed up and over a moun­tain until we came to a spot where the road ended. “Now we have to hike in, the rest of the way”, our guide said.
My wife and I looked at each other with appre­hen­sion. The only thing visible was thick brush and heavy timber ahead. I told my wife that I would fall back behind her and our guide as we hiked in, as a safety measure. Was this guy for real or had we accepted a ride from a possible Klondike mass murderer? The thoughts went through my head.
After about a half-mile hike through mosquito-infested brush, we suddenly came into a clearing. There before us were a number of old deserted cabins from the 1898 gold rush. Many cabins still contained remains of furni­ture and some uten­sils on the tables. We saw an old gravesite with sixty head stones. This was at the base of the steep Chilkoot ice steps that the miners climbed on their way to the gold fields of the Yukon. As the story has been told, the miners waited for days to climb the ice steps, single file and burdened down with all their gear. On one occa­sion, one slipped and fell – – bringing the others down with him, resulting in the deaths of sixty miners. All now buried in that graveyard.
After safely returning that after­noon to Skagway, we reflected on what we had expe­ri­enced that after­noon. The whole expe­ri­ence of that after­noon directed me to a different approach to the art I later produced. I created a large assem­blage, depicting the history and the events of that area.

For the Glacier Bay assign­ment, I painted one of the massive glac­iers. I was trying to capture the quiet­ness of this vast land­scape. The quiet, once in awhile, only broken by the roar of an ice cliff collapsing into the bay, called “caving”.
Norman Nicholson

An Other-Worldly Experience”
Artist Robert Bausch was born in 1938 in San Fran­cisco and grew up in Cali­fornia. After grad­u­ating from college he was an art director for several adver­tising agen­cies in San Fran­cisco before he launched a free­lance design and illus­tra­tion busi­ness in 1968. He has always had a strong interest in avia­tion, and has produced many paint­ings of aircraft, which led to his partic­i­pa­tion in the Air Force Art Program. He also made several paint­ings for the US Navy and NASA.

In 1979 the National Park Service commis­sioned him to travel to Carlsbad Caverns as part of the Artist-In-Residence Program, where he produced sketches on the spot, down in the caverns. Bausch had never been to Carlsbad before, and found being under­ground for hours at a time to be an unfor­get­table expe­ri­ence. This was also the first time he had been to the South­west, and the sweeping land­scapes made a lasting impres­sion. Bausch reflects on his time in the cave:

The expe­ri­ence of visiting Carlsbad Caverns was surely one of the most unusual ones I’ve ever had. What an aston­ishing thing the caverns are! It would have been different enough just being there. But the fact that I was actu­ally working “down below,” drawing and thinking about what I was drawing, in this very strange and awesome place, was quite a treat for the senses. Every morning after break­fast for four days I went down and sat on a camp­stool and started sketching. This was early in the day, and very few other people were about, if any. Down here was a truly magical world, the prehis­toric depths of our planet. The lighting was very subdued, and it was extremely quiet, except for the sound of drip­ping water, echoing from unseen cham­bers around me, as the process of the forma­tion of the caverns continued. I will never forget this other-worldly experience.”
Bausch created a series of impres­sion­istic pen-and-ink render­ings on illus­tra­tion board and paper of various areas in the cave, and donated a total of nine large draw­ings. Some of the draw­ings were executed using only detailed hatched ink lines, while others were enhanced with ink washes. Each drawing also has a line of hand-written text at the bottom describing the loca­tion. Docu­menting the process of a drawing with text as part of the finished image was very popular in the 1970s.
Lois Manno

In 2009, Lois Manno, who at the time had been volun­teering at Carlsbad Caverns for 15 years, and has been involved with the National Park Service for many years, published a beau­tiful book, Visions Under­ground, which chron­i­cles various artist’s involve­ment with Carlsbad Caverns, and the art they have produced as a result. 4 of Bausch’s draw­ings are featured in the book.
Robert Bausch

Assign­ment: Harpers Ferry Histor­ical National Park, WV
SFSI member, Ed Diffenderfer

Dick and I phoned Ed who described the trip in the Fall of 1970. He said that before leaving home, Mary Ann planned an extended stay. They would rent a car and touch on selected loca­tions in that region of our country.

When they arrived at Harpers Ferry, viewing and taking many photos, Ed said that the history of both; that loca­tion and aboli­tionist John Brown, combined in deter­mining his illustration.
[Mary Ann, was a commer­cial artist before she turned her talents to writing. She has had a number of books published. This from her recent email to us: “I have a novel coming out soon (September) about a woman artist — “All Kinds of Beauty”.”]
She suggested that I search the life story of John Brown.

Here, first, is Ed Diffenderfer’s painting.

Following Ed’s painting (and a photo of Ed from the 2001 SFSI Reunion) I show images that I have found about John Brown—
‑the man: Born May 9, 1800, ancestry back to 17th-century English Puri­tans, and from a staunchly Calvinist and anti­slavery family. Father of 20 chil­dren (some sons, were also aboli­tion­ists). Many years involved with the Under­ground Rail­road and other anti-slavery efforts.
‑the Harpers Ferry Raid that he insti­gated: On the evening of October 16, 1859, Brown led 21 men on a raid of the federal armory of Harpers Ferry in Virginia (now West Virginia). Holding dozens of men hostage his followers gath­ered the stored guns with the plan of inspiring slaves to march north, to freedom.
Brown’s forces held out for two days but they were even­tu­ally defeated by mili­tary forces led by Robert E. Lee. Many of Brown’s men were killed, including two of his sons, and he was captured.
‑and the price he paid: — hanged — for his attempt to abolish slavery in the years before the Civil War.

Visiting West Virginia at that time of the year, Ed said that they found the trees were showing their ulti­mate of colors. He said that they drove a lot, stop­ping at the chosen loca­tions, such as Norman Rockwell’s orig­inal: home-studio / museum in Stock­bridge, Massachusetts.
Ed said that the collec­tion, there, offered the chance to see the detail of the brush­strokes on paint­ings never seen when repro­duced in halftone printing.
The Diff­end­er­fers trav­eled as far as Rock­port, MA and then it was soon time to return to Cali­fornia and start painting.

Yosemite and Mount McKinley National Park
G. Dean Smith studied at Pratt Insti­tute in New York and the Art Center School in Los Angeles before opening a graphic design firm in San Fran­cisco in 1959. It was in 1962 — for San Francisco’s ABC outlet, KGO-TV, that he designed (known as the Circle 7 logo) – the first of the trade­mark symbols that were to make him known nationally.

Confer­ence of National Park Concessioners
For this leaflet shown: “Welcome to your park” — Dick Moore was asked by G. Dean Smith to show the various services avail­able for visi­tors during their stay in the US National Parks.

Welcome to the Tetons
Line art of a section of a full moun­tain range — Dick created this line drawing for a folder about the Grand Tetons for G. Dean Smith. The year and details are forgotten. Just this sample remains.

Norm Nicholson and Robert Bausch supplied the stories of their experiences.
Then, with a phone call to Ed Diff­end­erfer, I was able to present the third National Park Service, “Artists In The Parks” report.
The other samples, here, were not part of the SFSI project.
G. Dean Smith’s trade­marks for the NPS were designed in 1968 –for the Yosemite Park & Curry Co. and in 1970 –for the Mount McKinley National Park.
The assign­ments that Dean gave to Dick Moore in the 1970s show other graphic designs required by the Confer­ence of National Park Concessioners.
To show the loca­tions of the parks described, I added the maps from Google.

Ann Thompson


Plastics!

Plas­tics!
—about fifty years ago and today.

Then—
In January of 1972, I was designing the graphics for a plastic container to hold meal­worms – packed with thir diet of corn­meal, to be sold to ”bait” fish­ermen. (Dried meal­worms were and are sold as pet food and chicken feed.) But Mighty Mealys were prooduced to a larger size and sold “alive”! The printed promo mate­rial was for the bait shop owners. But they learned quickly to empty each package into a large glass container. (*If the product didn’t sell quickly, the shop would have been crawling). For a sale, the meal­worms with their corn­meal were then scooped out and counted and put into the Mighty Mealys plastic containers.
I still have one to show here. It is a fairlly stiff plastic and there are tiny pin holes around the lid for oxygen. The container’s instruc­tions says: to keep the pack­ages of 50 or 100 meal­worms out of the sun or heat and for longer life add a water source, such as an apple or a carrot.

I wrote of this project, here in 2011 (see: Geezers’ Gallery Pack­aging Worms) .
My report then, told how the sample package with the product inside — was left for too many days and the *meal­worms ate their way out of the plastic container.
Back then, we didn’t know that today there would be three swirling islands of plas­tics in the Pacific Ocean – each the size of Texas and giant walls of plastic trash – waiting in recy­cling ware­houses and collecting on remote Easter Island’s beaches.
The plas­tics, huge to micro­scopic, are diffi­cult to collect and impos­sible to melt, bury or burn.

Now—
Just about a month ago, in the San Fran­cisco Chron­icle of 122219, I saw this report that Stan­ford Univer­sity had recently discov­ered that meal­worms eat plastic.
Now, with one of the biggest trash prob­lems on earth — how can we cover our problem with these crit­ters that morph into beetles to fly off to a tastier diet in cornfields?
Their excre­ment is only partially organic. There are chem­i­cals from the plastic in the drop­pings that are small enough to blow away. The report doesn’t explain how this research can affect the problem.

On 11020, PBS’s KQED presented an hour on plas­tics where it was said that a bacteria might dine on the chem­i­cals that are in plas­tics. And — will they be good bacteria or — ?
The PBS report told of highway surfaces made from one kind of recy­cled plastic because of it’s long life, but that use isn’t enough to make any differ­ence as re-use. Also footwear has re-used selected plas­tics. It is the 10 ft. walls of mixed plastic trash that is collecting on streets and floating in the seas.
Boycott of prod­ucts sold in plas­tics? Bring your own containers?
Make the purchaser respon­sible? Make the producers responsible?
Develop an organic, quickly degrad­able mate­rial to replace plastic?
The report showed a residual from beer-making that produced a plastic-like mate­rial that can even be eaten.
Some solu­tions are needed, SOON !

More, from then—
This was the time that the US market­place received a new kind of world­wide product from various phar­ma­ceu­tical laboratories.

I was free­lancing at that same time (1969 to 1974) with a small art studio (graphics*) in the Wharf­side Building (680 Beach Street, SF). Our loca­tion was next to the offices of Klemptner Casey, a phar­ma­ceu­tical adver­tising agency with Robert Buechert as Creative Director. Our group was able to be their art service for most of their clients’ needs (as well as our other accounts in San Francisco).
KC had Syntex Labs as their client, which had recently won approval of one of the first oral preg­nancy contra­cep­tives. The “pill” became very contro­ver­sial but it was also the time of “women’s liber­a­tion era” in the USA.
Some worried about side effects — some objected that the oral contra­cep­tive would prevent a “natural event”. Up to 1973 (Roe vs. Wade) untold numbers of females of all ages in the USA were dying from amateur proce­dures to stop preg­nan­cies. Even today, the U.S. ranks far behind other indus­tri­al­ized nations in maternal mortality. I didn’t have statis­tics when I ques­tioned my ethic on working on this product– but I felt that the pill would protect women and its promo­tion would not be a mistake.

The launch of the Syntex’s “Norinyl 180” and “Norinyl 1 – 50”— required medical journal ads, brochures, patient aid book­lets, pack­aging and more.
The 8‑panel (two panels were prescribing Infor­ma­tion) brochure, shown below, had a two-page photo. It was a very expen­sive re-creation of a 1934 labo­ra­tory. I never knew the photog­ra­pher or the team that set up the room. (There is one error – some­thing not accu­rate for the date of the fake labo­ra­tory.) The brochure, launching the product, was the complete story of the devel­op­ment of the oral contra­cep­tive. The Mexican barbasco yam was the basis of the “pill” that changed many lifestyles.

(Above, the tiny error in the re-created labo­ra­tory was the two “grounded” elec­trical sockets – below the white jacket hanging on the wall).

I show the pack­aging for Syntex’s Brevicon 28-day tablets. My orig­inal subtle colors, had to be changed to brighter colors because the pack­aging was changed to blue, instead of white. The floral illus­tra­tion needed to be brighter.

Phar­ma­ceu­tical labs and physi­cians were teaching women of repro­duc­tive age how to use their 28-day product each month. The labs couldn’t package the pills loosely in large quan­ti­ties – – each pill for the month had to be punched out in sequence from a card with a thin foil backing. The style of the dispensers, that held the cards, varied from one “brand” of pill to the next.
Promoting the style of the plastic dispenser was empha­sized to the Syntex product repre­sen­ta­tives that called on the physi­cians who would write the prescrip­tions for their patients.

Here are 10 of 72 images from a slide presen­ta­tion to Brevicon reps promoting Brevicon and the pill holder — in compar­ison to competing brands.

(Why did I only show men as doctors? My mother had a woman doctor, way back when I was born !)

The Wallette was a discreet cover for the pill dispenser. For the 5‑view layout, I acci­den­tally rendered one of the female hands darker than the others. It was a lucky error because that caused a discus­sion to choose, for this file folder, a hand-model with a tan– to suggest patients were other than white females.

In 1974, Syntex and other medical prod­ucts moved from Klemptner Casey to J. Walter Thompson and later from JWT to an agency named Barnum Commu­ni­ca­tions (with Bob Buechert at each move).
In 1975, I began free-lancing at Barnum Commu­ni­ca­tions (owner Jim Barnum was of the circus family). JWT had filed legal action for moving Syntex prod­ucts to his agency, newly located at 560 Pacific Avenue, SF.
Time went by, there were even “law-suit” ballads composed by the musi­cally inclined who worked at Barnum Commu­ni­ca­tions. Finally JWT settled. The case was dropped when Mr. Barnum agreed to “cease and desist working in the West”. That left about seven of the agency founders to inherit all of the clients.
1977 there was a move to 901 Battery Street with the new name Vicom Asso­ciates. After another move to One Lombard Street, a few years passed and it was acquired by Foote, Cone & Belding Health­care as Vicom / FCB.
Shown below: Two sections, of a 6‑page, 1992 Vicom / FCB Anniver­sary Party Report. I didn’t know of these parties, but was asked to illus­trate this one. (My illus­tra­tion of “The VICOM Culture” was flopped hori­zon­tally before printing, causing the “initial V” to look strange. The last three show: my window, my work­space and my parking space on the roof (just my car, another week-end deadline).

One Lombard was my last San Fran­cisco location.
( Follow0up: So how many other prod­ucts, housed in plastic, did I promote? I’ll have to check back. But who even knew at that time, that one-use-plastics were piling up?)
Ann Thompson

Geezer Photo Get-Together 2019

Starting A Geezer Year­book Collection

This year, for many reasons, our usual October picnic as viewed (“Gath­er­ings” in the list at the left) was discon­tinued. To keep a meeting going, I have reached out to our members by email and asked for contri­bu­tions to this new “Photo Gath­ering”. I wasn’t able to give everyone enough time to find a photo and write a few words, but I am happy to show this collec­tion which numbers the same amount as we had at the last picnic.

Note: It just shows you—I requested, of a creative group, a “Mug Shot” from the 1970s or 1980s — and what did I get? The first responses: a present day photo, two in front of a laundry?, two sketches, multiple photos! OK. I followed their lead, and I changed my “mug shot” to show myself at the drawing board. The couple of sentences requested also became better than I had imagined.
Ann

1‑Allen, Jack In 1966, San Fran­cisco maga­zine published this picture of me in their September issue, Volume 8, No. 9 — cred­iting me for my cover photo showing a couple in the early morning hours on Hotaling Place.
2‑Barnes, Brian Trouble finding stuff that is sharp and presentable. Seven­ties mate­rial is almost all on 35mm slide. This was taken around 1987 at Walter Swarthout’s studio for a Gallo shoot when I was at Hal Riney. I had my left forearm propped on the shoulder of a fly fish­erman male model who I cropped out for your purpose. Walt had us ‘horse around ‘after­ward and he captured this. Good times.
3‑Broad, David In response to your request — this is from 1945, Frank­furt, Germany, the war had just ended and we became the Army of Occu­pa­tion. After discharge I signed up as a civilian with a job as an artist. This was the Infor­ma­tion and Educa­tion Unit — Jerome Snyder was the leading art director along with several artists who as civil­ians before the war were famous in New York. Need­less to say it was a heady experience.
4‑Eckart, Chuck I’m still working, painting, and enjoying it. I have a large exhi­bi­tion coming up at the Seager Gray Gallery during February 2020. The how will be opening on my 85th birthday. I’ll send you an announce­ment just before show time. Chuck
5‑Ericksen, Marc Free­lancing in San Fran­cisco was the best of the best, a dream come true, and resulted in a load of wonderful memo­ries. The clients, the Niners, the creativity. the fun, and the wonderful Bay. We had it all!

6‑Escasany, Richard and Kenwood, Dale Richard Escasany and Dale Kenwood 1976 outside Wing Lees Elec­tric Laundry.
7‑Fugazzotto, Joel Here’s my photo. On stage in Holly­wood in the 1980s shooting a commer­cial with Vern Gillum and Friends.
Joel Fugaz­zotto
8‑Hardgrove, John Cele­brating my 75th birthday in Alsace, France. Finally retired after a 50-year career in adver­tising and graphic design. TV produc­tion assis­tant 1965 – 68: Guild,Bascom,Bonfigli. Dancer Fitzgerald Sample. 1969 – 76 Creative Director Aviva Enter­prises, Peanuts char­acter merchan­dise. 1977 – 2015, Owner, Creative Director, The Design Bunch, print adver­tising, graphic design for corpo­rate commu­ni­ca­tions, posters and package design. Currently, I’m painting commis­sioned water­color dog portraits, and golf courses at home.
9‑Heil, Ross Photo from this spring — 2019 — Walnut Creek. Vice Pres­i­dent — McCann-Erickson, San Fran­cisco — 1972 to 1984. Account Manager — Del Monte Corpo­ra­tion. (Sorry, no 1970s — 1980s image avail­able — the photo­stats have faded)
10-Lessig, Paul 2019, Sparks, NV. As an ‘Alumni’ of the Wyman Co.‘s Art Dept (and who in the 50’s & 60’s wasn’t) tallied-forth thru Account Exec­u­tive assign­ments with Hoefer, Diet­rick & Brown & Camp­bell Ewald. In 1965 joined Fromm & Sichel, World­wide Distrib­u­tors and Marketers of the Chris­tian Brothers Wines and Brandy as International/National Sales Promo­tion Director; then Pres­i­dent & CEO of its Marketing/Sales Promo­tion Agency in 1972. Left the asso­ci­a­tion and the Adver­tising Industry in 1977 to pursue other career interests.
11-McKee, Gale Here is a photo of me helping an intern at Artworks in the mid-seventies.
I worked there from 1974 to 1978 as a rep and graphic designer, ( double commission!)
and then married the boss.(Don McKee) Job secu­rity… LOL ! I have been painting and showing art at various venues in Santa Rosa and Marin since 2009. My last job was not in advertising
but was the perfect job for me: designer & illus­trator for Pottery Barn kids. I was there 8 years and the ONLY one who never used a computer…everything by hand!
12-Miller, Todd Oh yeah…if you got the photo I sent…t was taken by Don Hadley in my office at Bots­ford Ketchum in 1977.? We were working on the Olympia Beer campaign at the time. I don’t remember how he took the photo (4 photos like that in a square). I think Jill Murray may have been there. I know, it was after a lunch at Hoff­man’s Grill (Don and I always ordered Chicken Fried Steak with extra gravy at Hoff­man’s Grill every Friday). It was the first time Don laughed so hard beer came out his nose.(we were talking about how “creativity” works and Don asked who could define “creativity” and I said “that’s a very large bird that flies in the Andes”. I guess Don had more than his usual one glass of beer (kidding). For some reason, Don found my response very funny. Today…I would call it senility.
13-Moore, Dick During an interim between my years of commer­cial illus­tra­tion (as Dick Moore), I was living, painting & exhibiting throughout the Hawaiian Islands for 7 years (as Richard Moore). Lovely times. (Photo, 1981)

14-Nielsen, Larry Is this too off the wall? It was taken in Marrakesh, Morocco of me and our guide.
15-Nicholson, Norman 525 Pacific Ave Group, 1970’s
16-Novy, Norma Attached is my mug shot. Hey, this is nice since I’m all the way in Medford, OR. Hank and I will be home to Marin for 2 days this Xmas to see family and friends. I hope you all are doing well. Norma
17-Nusser, Kirsten Tirsbak Photo: Early 1980s, Kirsten T. Sinclair, 901 Battery Street, SF, as in-house free­lancer for FCB Health­care. 1966 – 1970: I moved from Esbjerg, Denmark, to Cali­fornia, first employed by Psychology Today Magazine’s graphics depart­ment in Del Mar, and then as a designer for Simonson and Shaw Design, in LA. 1972 to present: In San Fran­cisco, I often was a CD or an AD. With years of many and various clients, that also included my ”hands-on” and full computer graphic skills, I am now happily retired, volun­teering my design expe­ri­ence to help non-profits and others with requests that keep me busy.
18-Oka, Jane Teiko 1954: Schol­ar­ship to Cali­fornia School of Fine Arts in San Fran­cisco and grad­u­ated with a Bachelor’s Degree.
Employed as graphic designer by Patterson & Hall in San Francisco.
Received a Fulbright schol­ar­ship in 1960 to study in Japan.
1962: Began free­lance career in the city with major clients and also created calen­dars, gift items, package design, posters, story­book and school­book illustrations.
Steadily working by mail with east coast clients — to get out of the house — assisted Marin County’s Wild­Care, and later, The Marine Mammal Center (for nine­teen years) as an “outside” interest. (1968 Photo by Tom King)
19-Pratt, John After a day’s shoot with Walter Swarthout in the Seven­ties, he wasn’t ready to quit. He insisted I sit for him with this result.
20-Pyle, Chuck Chuck Pyle, formerly young and hungry illus­trator. Currently, Old and teacher/department Chair at Academy of Art University.
21-Riney, Lee I just sent you a photo of me when I was working at Foote, Cone and then Young & Rubicam. It was taken years and years ago by Hal Riney in my Tele­graph Hill studio, which cost $75 per month. We were soon to be married, and needed pass­port photos for our honey­moon to Europe.
As you know, I was the first of Hal’s five wives. Lee Riney
22-Rustad, Steve This was shot a few years back, on loca­tion at the Geyserville Gun Club (really, just a hipster bar. No firearm). I was directing an episode of Fermen­ta­tion Road, which was part of Season Two of the YouTube series: Spoiled to Perfection.

23-Schumaker, Ward Me at the Jack Fischer Gallery for a showing of my trump Papers, last November 2018.
24-Somers, Dick Kauai, Hawaii. My wife of almost 56 years and I spend much of February and March on Kauai, almost every year. It is a place where one can truly relax.
25-Robert G. Steele Here are three photos from USAF Art Program. Many local illus­tra­tors partic­i­pated in this great program from the early sixties until about 2010, trav­eling and painting as guests of the USAF.
1. 1993 Air Force Art Presen­ta­tion at Bolling Air Force Base, DC. Rt. to left: Marc Eric­sson and me, Robert Steele (SF Society of Illus­tra­tors) and Matthew Holmes (Sacra­mento).
2. 2006 USAF Art presen­ta­tion, Andrews AFB
3. 2008 USAF Art presen­ta­tion. Wash/DC 2008.
26-Stewart. Bill The photo I sent was taken in my studio at home in San Rafael in mid 80s (I think).
I was working as an art director with Bots­ford Cons­tine & McCarty on the ?Olympia Beer account at that time.
27-Stitt, Jim Photo: Blair Heagerty / SFGate. Born and raised in Seattle, served in two different wars and armed forces — the Navy in WWII and the Marines in the Korean War — attended two different art schools on the G.I. Bill (including the pres­ti­gious ArtCenter College of Design in Pasadena), worked as a tech­nical illus­trator for Boeing, and spent 30 years as an art director for an adver­tising agency in Los Angeles. I didn’t care for LA so I came to San Fran­cisco, connecting with Hal Riney, and got a job at SF’s BBD&O as Art Director. I was offered the Spice Islands account at Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample.
I’ve illus­trated 44 of the 45 labels for Anchor Christmas Ale, a beloved annual holiday offering from the 123-year-old brewery that features both a new recipe and unique hand drawn tree every year. Hand­made beers require hand­made labels.
From Jim’s daughter, Janis:
Jim was inter­viewed in December 2019 by CBS since Fritz Maytag and Anchor Steam Brewery is being honored into the Smith­sonian as one of the first microbreweries.
As you can imagine we are all proud and excited, but Papa Jim is humbled as always.

28-Sweeny, Charlie, Art Director, Cunningham & Walsh, San Francisco
29-Thompson, Ann Photo: Early ‘70s, Wharf­side Building, 680 Beach Street, SF. Free­lancing from 1965 to 2001 – enjoyed every assign­ment (Job #1 to #3,445, Whew!) and met great talents in SF’s graphics commu­nity. Since then, creating my own projects. (Photo by Tom Moulin.)
Ann is the power behind the Geezers Gallery. She does all the hard work. ph
30-Tom, Jack Selfie taken in the Grand Canyon AZ, 2019?“Born in San Fran­cisco, now live, work and teach in Connecticut.”?” I love being a graphic designer and love teaching what I love!”
31-Young, Ron Founder and CEO Shocase, Inc. Here are three photos which span ½ a century in the adv biz. 1968-Receiving Clio. Levi’s Radio Commer­cial featuring the JEFFERSON AIRPLANE. Adver­tising Hall of Fame in NYC. Adver­tising Hall of Fame at Wall Street Ciprioni, NYC