POP and POS

In the years shown here, “Point Of Purchase” and “Point Of Sale” were the terms to describe the many items that made prod­ucts appealing, (Today the term: Point Of Sale or POS is widely defined as the process of purchasing the product or service.)

In the years of 1970 to 1975, I was able to touch on this area of marketing. From label and product designs to the promo pieces that brought atten­tion to the product in a store setting. These assign­ments gave me a sense of being there, greeting the customers. (I was young.)

The A. Carlisle & Co. of San Fran­cisco had the printing and construc­tion equip­ment to develop a variety of store displays. Carlisle’s creative direc­tors gave me — twelve assign­ments. Here are some exam­ples:

Shasta: In 1889 “Shasta” was known for the waters from the Mt. Shasta, CA region.

In the years after 1931 it was devel­oped into a ginger ale or soda and they were offered usually as a mix for alco­holic drinks. In the 1950s Shasta Cola became avail­able in cans. Oper­ating from their head­quar­ters in Hayward CA, the Shasta company was a nearby client for adver­tising assign­ments.

1970 Shasta Cola, Shelf‐Talker. This was an unusual idea at that time – opaque inks printed on foil, with a die‐cut. This was to show along with the Shasta Cola displayed on the market shelf.

C&H Sugar: (Cali­fornia and Hawaiian Sugar Company) As early as 1906, ships from Hawaii were sailing into San Fran­cisco Bay, then north­east through San Pablo Bay reaching the port of Crockett where they offloaded raw cane sugar. C&H today, produces 700,000 tons of sugar annu­ally. C&H was a steady client for San Fran­cisco ad agen­cies and printing compa­nies.

1971 C&H Sugar Hawaii (3‐D wire hangers). Here the request was to have two “Wire‐Hangers” with two different scenes on each side (one showing daytime and the other side, night­time. Also there was a banner with the words: “LUAU LAND

1972 C&H Sugar (Wire Hangers). I first tried other rough ideas: an egg and bunny as a folded die‐cut in an egg shape – – a little bunny – – a chicken – – then two layouts preceded the final five wire‐hangers.

1973-Elec­tric & Gas Indus­tries Asso­ci­a­tionEIGA. Orig­i­nally head­quar­tered in San Fran­cisco, with roots from the early 1930s, EGIA began as a nonprofit member­ship asso­ci­a­tion with the mission to help promote the sale of energy‐efficient appli­ances for retailers throughout the state of Cali­fornia. EIGA is now located in Sacra­mento, CA.

1973: Clorox’s Liquid‐plumr

Liquid‐plumr” made by Clorox with head­quar­ters in Oakland CA, was another regional client. Not having a color Xerox in those years, I show these four exam­ples in b/w. The one chosen was to be rendered as finished art, printed and then placed in markets near the product.

The large wine industry in Cali­fornia gave the Carlisle Company many oppor­tu­ni­ties of displaying a variety of displays and bins that would hold many bottles and have photographs portraying an elegant display of the wines.

1973: Inglenook wine was founded in Ruther­ford, Cali­fornia during 1879 by Gustave Niebaum, a Finnish sea captain.

This Inglenook page of layouts offered the client a choice of photo­graphic settings. The clients would choose the mood that they wanted displayed and a photog­ra­pher would follow the basic “look” and be the one to choose all of the elements for the “table‐top” setting. The chosen “look” is shown also.

1973: Chilean Wines. Carlisle’s client, here, might have been a company dealing mostly with wines imported into San Fran­cisco Bay. It might have been the begin­ning of the San Fran­cisco Wine Trading Company. (I have no other source.) For this assign­ment, we offered many choices of subjects for the “feel” of a Chilean vine­yard. Two of the subjects were devel­oped.

1973: One of California’s oldest and most renowned wineries, Geyser Peak Winery was founded in 1880 by Augustus Quitzow, a pioneer in Alexander Valley wine­making,

1974: POP concepts for imported BABYSHAM.

1973 – 1974: Anna­corré. I don’t have notes on this display sheet as to who brought this job to us, nor the name of the parent winery. I cannot find any infor­ma­tion about this wine, on line.

United Vint­ners Starting in 1975 I got a number of assign­ments from United Vint­ners, usually through ad agen­cies such as McCann Erickson. Some assign­ments were also for maga­zine ads, and posters for Guild Brandy. A “warm‐up” jacket was offered.

How many ways can you offer a wood wine‐rack for $22.00?

For Inglenook, these b&w copies were Magic Marker color sketches to show eleven ways to make that offer on their in‐store display bins.

This other (folded) display layout was to be placed behind a collec­tion of Inglenook bottles.

United Vint­ners, in those days, also had the three TJ Swann ($1.75) fruit wines: Easy Nights, Mellow Days, and After Hours. These are no longer avail­able in markets. This “Dial a Wine” was to be attached to the refrig­er­ated cases that held these wines. The turn of the dial to 15 descrip­tive sentences, would offer the suggested fruit wine for each occa­sion!

This was one of three strange assign­ments, so far in my career. (The first was the pack­aging of meal­worms for fishing. (“Mighty Mealys” was a previous story.) The other was for a J. Walter Thompson client: Shakey’s Pizza. They planned a Christmas P.O.P. poster showing a slice of pizza with the Shakey’s logo as the star on the top. 7‐Up was an addi­tional product to show – so bottle caps were orna­ments and the 7‐Up bottle was the trunk of the tree. (I’ve tried to forget that assign­ment.)

Browne Vint­ners

Paul Masson (1859 – 1940) emigrated from Burgundy, France to Cali­fornia in 1878. In 1892 he devel­oped his first sparkling wine. Masson even­tu­ally became known as the “Cham­pagne King of Cali­fornia”.

Late 1970s: David Reid, creative director at Browne Vint­ners, planned that this poster for Paul Masson wines to be, actu­ally, a P.O.P.!

The artist, Dick Moore, said that it was offered FREE– as a “tear‐off‐sheet”.

ADASF 1958 – 1971

Here is a collec­tion of designs accepted in the annual exhi­bi­tions of the Art Direc­tors and Artists Club of San Fran­cisco. Point Of Purchase aka: Point Of Sale.

One might ques­tion how a large outdoor board could be a point of sale. The two “OK” boards, in the ‘70s, were place at the side of the large Chevrolet lots selling “OK” approved used cars. Too bad, that the annuals were only in black and white. (I had one color example, so I added it.

The many San Fran­cisco Bay Area graphic artists and art studios — had steady sources of employ­ment. Reviewing all of these exam­ples from the few years shown, I wonder how the POP industry is oper­ating now. Do artists still have the freedom to develop and render various choices for the client, printing shops, or ad agen­cies – – still with markers or what?

Ann Thompson

An Apple For The Artist

Long before an Apple Computer became one of my art tools, I was asked to create Illus­tra­tions “the old fash­ioned way” for the Apple IIGS Owner’s Guide (manuals are no longer offered).
Apple’s Macin­tosh had been intro­duced in 1984, yet the Apple II series of computers continued for about ten more years. When I was awarded the job on 82685 my finished artwork was still accom­plished with illus­tra­tion boards, pens, brushes and inks. At that same time, I had my free­lance and agency‐in‐house artist space in the Vicom Associate’s offices on Battery Street in San Fran­cisco.

There were a couple of meet­ings with Apple, when I would drive down to Cuper­tino to plan an art style and page design and also deter­mine my price for the job. Trans­lating copy to art for Apple Computer’s IIGS manual, I was asked to keep my spots “light‐hearted”. Every­thing devel­oped smoothly and when I needed the accu­racy of depicting the four Apple computers avail­able those days, I turned to Richard Moore (free­lancing from our home) to compose and create the finished detailed art of the four existing line of Apple II computers.

Apple IIGS Owner’s Guide. 1986, Apple Computer, Inc.
Concepts and Illus­tra­tions: Ann Thompson, Art Direc­tion: Molly Tyson; addi­tional product illus­tra­tions: Dick Moore.

Soon, more Apple II Guides were needed, but my orig­inal agency accounts in SF needed me. My contacts in Cuper­tino asked me “Are there any more like you at home?” and I said, “Yes” and Richard Moore completed several more manuals for them. Apple was glad that Richard set us up at home with an Apple IICX –$16,000 (at that time) including printer, scanner, (the works)! Richard’s Apple illus­tra­tions for the manuals were, for the first time, created with an Apple computer!

The Macin­tosh, A Better Apple Was Presented.

Apple’s Macin­tosh computers were being intro­duced and soon set up in Vicom Asso­ciates’ art depart­ment. At one point, the agency wanted to test the Macintosh’s abil­i­ties against my usual methods of making the large, 24” X 36” — presen­ta­tion boards for the agency’s meet­ings with their various clients. The require­ments: –quality of message and speed — I won, achieving both require­ments!

The art depart­ment could only print letter‐sized prints from their Macs. The crew in the art depart­ment had to (1‐search and choose from the limited choices of clip‐art, (2‐compose the type, boxes, arrows and images, (3‐print out the docu­ment, (4‐send it out to a copy shop to make a Photo­stat up to display size and then (5‐wait for the b/w print and when it arrived, spray‐mount it to a foam core board. I had the benefit of 1 sheet of large layout paper, full color (markers and pencils) and I could compose unlim­ited subjects. I often had to work through the night on those display boards that were to fly in the morning to an early meeting on the east coast. (Using the Mac, the agency would have had to keep the art crew and copy shop into the night.) My boards became known in this agency as “Annie‐Boards”! When one of our art direc­tors moved to another adver­tising agency, she, out of habit, asked for “Annie‐ Boards” to be made.”Animatics”?, “anima­tion?”, her co‐workers asked. She said that she had to describe my boards.
(Note: I don’t have the exact example from the compe­ti­tion, because it was shown at the planned client meeting.)

There were times that I could have asked for a Mac in my room in the agency, but there were young and eager hires ready to sit there with and art director over their shoulder, and I knew that I’d get into it on my own at home. When I did, we had an AppleIICX at home. My abil­i­ties grew as each new graphic soft­ware program became avail­able. I exper­i­mented with all kinds of subject, yet I would keep trying subjects needed for my agency assign­ments.
With the earlier computers and drawing programs, drawing with a “mouse” (like a small brick) it seemed not to matter if I was left or right‐handed. The very early computer line art had the large pixels. “Studio 8” offered a lot to the graphic artist, but the edges were still very rough. The Mac and the two Adobe programs: Photo­shop and Illus­trator offered a huge range of different qual­i­ties for different needs. These show the improve­ment of the graphic programs and my improve­ment using them.

Personal Exper­i­mental:

Job Subjects:

Ten Second Manager
Around the mid ‘90s I received many assign­ments for Apple Univer­sity (internal teaching publi­ca­tions). One assign­ment from Apple Univer­sity was a pocket‐sized hand­book for employees — the style of the illus­tra­tions was to be “more humorous”. Following the copy that was written for the pocket sized hand­book, 23 humorous illus­tra­tions were accepted.

Apple Univer­sity – The Ten‐Second Manager. 1996, Apple Computer, Inc.,
Copy: Molly Tyson, Design and Illus­tra­tions: Ann Thompson, Evan­ge­lism: Sherri Rose, Produc­tion & Moral Support: Ken Freehan

Internal Home­page: Apple Univer­sity
The first meet­ings were with the title, “The Art of Manage­ment”. Many more page arrange­ments brought us to the next sketch that you see with the title “Apple Univer­sity”. The final design is shown here on Netscape, the web browser of that time.

Leader’s Lounge” was a link from the Home­page. The high­lighted objects in the Lounge were “links” to addi­tional pages with more written infor­ma­tion.

Apple University’s Catalog of Services

Forty pages plus cover with 15 illus­tra­tions (mostly of them repeated from the Ten Second Manager.

These assign­ments, above, for Apple Univer­sity were my favorites because of the amount of creative freedom they gave to me. The Mac became my favorite art tool. I’m on our iMac, now.

Ann Thompson

Bill Shields

We have previ­ously posted collec­tions of Willi Baum and Dick Moore and most recently, some of Earl Thollander’s Chinese cooking illus­tra­tions.

Here is a showing of Bill Shield’s commer­cial art from the years: 1961 to 1975

Now, exam­ples of his fine art (with views of his workspace‐easel with art in progress).

Bill and family lived on Pine Street in San Fran­cisco. In time, by re‐building the home, it became the “Artists Inn” – with warm B&B hospi­tality and it was deco­rated with Bill’s paint­ings.
Bill also remod­eled the building at the rear of their prop­erty. It was Bill’s studio and orig­i­nally had spaces for other artists. Later, it also became an addi­tion to the inn that welcomed visi­tors to San Fran­cisco.

Show 3‐Artists Inn 1, 2 & 3

Ann Thompson

The 4 Caballeros (Part 2)

1962 The San Fran­cisco Exam­iner PICTORIAL LIVING. When three of the four artists returned to San Fran­cisco, their sketches inspired paint­ings. The San Fran­cisco Examiner’s head­line “How Six Bay Eyes Saw Mexico” did not include the fourth artist, Willi Baum. Because at that time, Willi was back in Mexico, in San Miguel, where he was designing a mural there. So Willi was not shown in the photo with the Examiner’s story.

Sept/Oct 1962 Commu­ni­cating Arts Maga­zine
Here also, are six pages showing the art and it includes the written comments from the artists. (The sketch that you see at the bottom of each page was a fifteen‐foot long, 360‐degree drawing that Earl Thol­lander made as he viewed the complete row of build­ings surrounding the open square where the artists were sketching.

On November 7, 1962, there was an exhi­bi­tion of sketches and paint­ings that were a result of the trip. It was held at the Art Unlim­ited Gallery in San Fran­cisco. The gallery was accessed from the ground floor and then a strait stair­case down to a base­ment. Willi had recently returned from San Miguel, but on the night of the gallery show, he appeared in a wheel­chair at the top of the long flight of stairs. The crowd showed concern about Willi’s condi­tion and worried how he planned to get to the lower level. Then, following his plan in “making an entrance” he stood up from the wheel­chair and casu­ally descended the stairs!
Not long after that occa­sion, Bill estab­lished a studio in New York. As a member of the Society of Illus­tra­tors, there, he received and awarded award of merit with his painting devel­oped from one of his sketches from the trip in Mexico (the last of the images that you see above). The four amigos, together Other sketch trips followed. Each of the four produced more and more paint­ings, beyond their commer­cial work.

Ann Thompson

Bill Shields – Friend And Artist

I first met Bill when he appeared in San Fran­cisco in 1960 and came to my studio on the recom­men­da­tion of a teacher, Marty Garrity, who taught cartooning at the Chicago Academy of Fine Art in Chicago. Bill studied there during the years 1945 to 1946 and I was there from 1948 to 1950. Marty kept tabs on most of his students and I’m sure he helped many to get together later when an oppor­tu­nity came up. Bill’s arrival in San Fran­cisco was smashing! He had no problem in capti­vating his clien­tele with his stun­ning design and artwork. His illus­tra­tions were appearing every­where and his swift execu­tion kept him busy. He was up to the demand and never disap­pointed!

I was living in Mill Valley and Bill soon moved his family there. He and I, for a time, commuted into the city in his Porsche. We brought our fami­lies together on camping trips where we sketched. Bill brought his talents into play designing and finishing his home to his stan­dards. We often sketched together in the city and managed many week­ends trav­eling with other artists, sketching and painting in the Gold country and along the northern Cali­fornia coast. For two weeks in 1962 our artist friends, Earl Thol­lander and Will Baum, joined us on a trip to Mexico where we visited the west coast town of Guaymas and then we trav­eled south­east to an old cobble­stone town named Alamos. This is where we spent most of our time sketching and enjoying the great differ­ences from our lives in the Bay Area. On our way back north we visited the Joshua Tree National Park. Willi set his camera’s timer and staged this photo. Here are three quick sketches that I made of Bill.

After our return, we prepared a gallery show in San Fran­cisco of paint­ings devel­oped from some of our work accom­plished there in Mexico. During our stay in Mexico I renewed my aver­sion to the Amer­ican Cock­roach, which were plen­tiful there. My fellow artists decided to capture one and put it in an enve­lope and tucked it under my pillow. The scratching sound alerted me to their joke. Bill addressed some of his many envelopes, without roaches, that I received though the years as “Dickaroacha”. Many years later in Hawaii, I over­came the aver­sion, and lived with many such crea­tures.

I was always amazed that Bill’s embell­ished envelopes actu­ally made it to my mailbox. His collec­tion had a few of mine, like this last one that you see above.

In late 1962 (after the gallery show) Bill moved and worked in New York for quite a few years and in 1975 he returned to San Fran­cisco where he estab­lished his Artists Inn studio where he painted. He also taught at various acad­e­mies in the city and Bay Area. Lucky students! My return from Hawaii to San Fran­cisco in 1982 gave us a chance to catch up and enjoy each other’s company and fami­lies, once again. Many lunches and partying happened through the years and an occa­sional sketch trip was always a joy.

Dick Moore