The Rest Of The Story

Three short reports — two resulting in tight friend­ships.
A Client — and much later — A Friend.
I recently received emails from Jill Perkins who told me about one of our industry’s un-sung heroes. John Perkins was there at Rapid Typog­ra­phers. (Estab­lished in 1963. Rapid Typog­ra­phers Co, Inc. provided type & graphic services to the local SF Ad Agen­cies, and Graphic Designers.)

John helped save many of us meet out morning presen­ta­tions by staying late hours preparing type galleys and/or final copy type and head­lines, ready for paste-up. (The follow-up is the friend­ship with a client – – long after the working years.)

This is Jill’s report:
John Perkins John was a part owner of Rapid Typog­raphy before it became Rapid, working with adver­tising agen­cies sending them proofs and disks and working with them for the benefit of their compa­nies.

John was the plant manager and hands on worker, often working late at night to meet agency’s dead­lines. John retired in 2006 and enjoyed working at home making Chardonnay wine in our 50 vines vine­yard he planted from scratch when we moved into our house in the late ‘90’s which had a large down­hill grass­land seem­ingly non-useable area. John designed the vine­yard and a large vegetable garden in this area, and we enjoyed our wine and vegeta­bles for many years.

One of his clients, Henry Wachs, designed the logo for UCSF. Henry created the first “MZ” block logo for Mount Zion Hospital and early iter­a­tions of BankAmeri­card.

After Henry retired John lost touch with him. Henry moved to live at The Redwoods in Mill Valley, and John, who had applied as a volun­teer companion with a local commu­nity agency — by pure happen chance though the volun­teer agency — was linked up with Henry because of their back­grounds. They became fast friends and compan­ions, going out to lunch and for walks weekly until Henry died at 91. John also became friends with Henry’s family.

John worked with many agen­cies, and many of them would come into Rapid, often at night to oversee the dead­lines.

I believe he met and worked with Lowell Herero, and as cat lovers, we always bought his wall calendar for our kitchen and loved the musing cat char­ac­ters.

Jill Perkins

1‑John Perkins
2‑Oct.3, 2012, Geezer Gath­ering with Henry Wachs
3‑On our way to Croatia, our last trip in May/June of 2019. We had a wonderful trip,
Don’t put off anything you want to do, as John Lennon so eloquently put it:
“Life happens when you’re making plans.”


A Second Phone Company !
Klemtner Casey Inc. was located at The Wharf­side Building on Beach Street In 1971. They gave me the following assign­ments. These two ad layouts were to intro­duce a new phone company – – to compete with the GIANT Bell Tele­phone Company! That client and the agency wanted me to show Bell Tele­phone restricted, and less of a monopoly. I couldn’t show “Ma Bell” tied up – – so we chose to show a giant, instead.

(The following, with thanks and my small $ contri­bu­tions to Wikipedia).
The Bell System was the system of compa­nies, led by the Bell Tele­phone C0. and later by AT&T which domi­nated the tele­phone services industry in North America for 100 years from its creation in 1877 until its demise in the early 1980s. The system of compa­nies was often collo­qui­ally called Ma Bell (as in “Mother Bell”), as it held a near-complete monopoly over tele­phone service in most areas of the United States and Canada. At the time of its breakup in the early 1980s, the Bell System had assets of $150 billion (equiv­a­lent to $370 billion in 2019) and employed over one million people.

(The Bell System logo and trade­mark was designed by Saul Bass in 1969.)

After this job, I never found out if Arcata Commu­ni­ca­tions became a viable compe­ti­tion to “the only phone company” avail­able. So now I looked up the name and the time and found that there were at least 3 years of legal action (19711973). The Indus­trial Reor­ga­ni­za­tion Act: The commu­ni­ca­tions industry by United States Congress. Senate Committee on the Judi­ciary. Subcom­mittee on Antitrust and Monopoly.

I could not find the result of that inves­ti­ga­tion.

Ann Thompson


A Silent Hero

It was the mid sixties, I had only worked at Honig, Cooper, & Harrington for a couple of months.

I did the art direc­tion on 3 in store posters for United Vint­ners ( Italian Swiss Colony ) I got Nic Sidjakov to do 3 beau­tiful full size tight comps. The meeting to present the work was at 4:00 pm, the Ad Manager showed up about a hour late. It was obvious that he just stum­bled out of a 4 hour 4 Martini lunch and he was totally wasted.

I was wearing Levi’s, Boots, Long hair, etc. I started to present the work and he started to give me a really hard time about the way I was dressed and the way I looked. I ignored him and just continued with the presen­ta­tion, and he got worse and worse and would not pay atten­tion to the fabu­lous work that Nic Sidjakov had done.He became totally abusive so I picked up the work and told him he was an asshole and I and I left.

When I left one of the two Account Exec­u­tives in the meeting was actu­ally crying as
this was her account and this thing had gone completely out of control. I went back to my office and started packing up my stuff thinking that there was no way I was not going to be fired. The two account exec’s imme­di­ately went to Bill Honig’s office and told him what happened. As I was packing my stuff Honig walked into my office and said “put that stuff away-nobody that works for me will ever be treated like that-don’t worry I’ll take care of it”

Two weeks later the obnox­ious ad manager was fired and the posters were approved and produced.
Honig and I became really good friends and he helped me in so many ways I can’t even count them. Few people know…but Bill Honig was a Angel of Ramparts and Rolling Stone, he person­ally paid for a anti smoking campaign, and he was a major art collector but I think he was most proud of being on Nixon’s White House Enemy List !

Chris Blum ( who wouldn’t be here today without Bill Honig )


So what happened to HC&H?
I found this:
UCR / The Cali­fornia Digital News­paper Collec­tion–Desert Sun, 1-10-1975
LOS ANGELES — Foote, Cone & Belding, eighth largest adver­tising agency in the U.S., and Honig-Cooper & Harrington, largest inde­pen­dent adver­tising agency on the West Coast have reported the comple­tion of the previ­ously announced merger that results in one agency with western billings in excess of $100 million. The announce­ment was made by Louis Honig, HCH board chairman, and Louis E. Scott, chairman of FCB’s exec­u­tive committee. A newly formed subsidiary, Foote, Cone & Belding/Honig, will manage the agen­cies’ merged western U.S. oper­a­tions. FCB/Honig will be the largest adver­tising agency oper­a­tion in the Western market. Honig becomes chairman and chief exec­u­tive officer of FCB/Honig. Scott continues as chairman of the exec­u­tive committee and a director of the parent company, Foote, Cone & Belding Commu­ni­ca­tions, Inc. Honig is head­quar­tered in San Fran­cisco and Scott in Los Angeles. The San Fran­cisco offices of HCH and FCB will be combined into one office, while the Los Angeles offices of HCH and FCB will continue as sepa­rate units.

Another follow-up,
I am plan­ning a future post about Nic Sidjakov who was, I think, the most prolific and versa­tile illus­trator in San Fran­cisco at the time of Chris Blum’s story.

Ann Thompson

Plastics!

Plas­tics!
—about fifty years ago and today.

Then—
In January of 1972, I was designing the graphics for a plastic container to hold meal­worms – packed with thir diet of corn­meal, to be sold to ”bait” fish­ermen. (Dried meal­worms were and are sold as pet food and chicken feed.) But Mighty Mealys were prooduced to a larger size and sold “alive”! The printed promo mate­rial was for the bait shop owners. But they learned quickly to empty each package into a large glass container. (*If the product didn’t sell quickly, the shop would have been crawling). For a sale, the meal­worms with their corn­meal were then scooped out and counted and put into the Mighty Mealys plastic containers.
I still have one to show here. It is a fairlly stiff plastic and there are tiny pin holes around the lid for oxygen. The container’s instruc­tions says: to keep the pack­ages of 50 or 100 meal­worms out of the sun or heat and for longer life add a water source, such as an apple or a carrot.

I wrote of this project, here in 2011 (see: Geezers’ Gallery Pack­aging Worms) .
My report then, told how the sample package with the product inside — was left for too many days and the *meal­worms ate their way out of the plastic container.
Back then, we didn’t know that today there would be three swirling islands of plas­tics in the Pacific Ocean – each the size of Texas and giant walls of plastic trash – waiting in recy­cling ware­houses and collecting on remote Easter Island’s beaches.
The plas­tics, huge to micro­scopic, are diffi­cult to collect and impos­sible to melt, bury or burn.

Now—
Just about a month ago, in the San Fran­cisco Chron­icle of 122219, I saw this report that Stan­ford Univer­sity had recently discov­ered that meal­worms eat plastic.
Now, with one of the biggest trash prob­lems on earth — how can we cover our problem with these crit­ters that morph into beetles to fly off to a tastier diet in corn­fields?
Their excre­ment is only partially organic. There are chem­i­cals from the plastic in the drop­pings that are small enough to blow away. The report doesn’t explain how this research can affect the problem.

On 11020, PBS’s KQED presented an hour on plas­tics where it was said that a bacteria might dine on the chem­i­cals that are in plas­tics. And — will they be good bacteria or — ?
The PBS report told of highway surfaces made from one kind of recy­cled plastic because of it’s long life, but that use isn’t enough to make any differ­ence as re-use. Also footwear has re-used selected plas­tics. It is the 10 ft. walls of mixed plastic trash that is collecting on streets and floating in the seas.
Boycott of prod­ucts sold in plas­tics? Bring your own containers?
Make the purchaser respon­sible? Make the producers respon­sible?
Develop an organic, quickly degrad­able mate­rial to replace plastic?
The report showed a residual from beer-making that produced a plastic-like mate­rial that can even be eaten.
Some solu­tions are needed, SOON !

More, from then—
This was the time that the US market­place received a new kind of world­wide product from various phar­ma­ceu­tical labo­ra­to­ries.

I was free­lancing at that same time (1969 to 1974) with a small art studio (graphics*) in the Wharf­side Building (680 Beach Street, SF). Our loca­tion was next to the offices of Klemptner Casey, a phar­ma­ceu­tical adver­tising agency with Robert Buechert as Creative Director. Our group was able to be their art service for most of their clients’ needs (as well as our other accounts in San Fran­cisco).
KC had Syntex Labs as their client, which had recently won approval of one of the first oral preg­nancy contra­cep­tives. The “pill” became very contro­ver­sial but it was also the time of “women’s liber­a­tion era” in the USA.
Some worried about side effects — some objected that the oral contra­cep­tive would prevent a “natural event”. Up to 1973 (Roe vs. Wade) untold numbers of females of all ages in the USA were dying from amateur proce­dures to stop preg­nan­cies. Even today, the U.S. ranks far behind other indus­tri­al­ized nations in maternal mortality. I didn’t have statis­tics when I ques­tioned my ethic on working on this product– but I felt that the pill would protect women and its promo­tion would not be a mistake.

The launch of the Syntex’s “Norinyl 180” and “Norinyl 1 – 50”— required medical journal ads, brochures, patient aid book­lets, pack­aging and more.
The 8‑panel (two panels were prescribing Infor­ma­tion) brochure, shown below, had a two-page photo. It was a very expen­sive re-creation of a 1934 labo­ra­tory. I never knew the photog­ra­pher or the team that set up the room. (There is one error – some­thing not accu­rate for the date of the fake labo­ra­tory.) The brochure, launching the product, was the complete story of the devel­op­ment of the oral contra­cep­tive. The Mexican barbasco yam was the basis of the “pill” that changed many lifestyles.

(Above, the tiny error in the re-created labo­ra­tory was the two “grounded” elec­trical sockets – below the white jacket hanging on the wall).

I show the pack­aging for Syntex’s Brevicon 28-day tablets. My orig­inal subtle colors, had to be changed to brighter colors because the pack­aging was changed to blue, instead of white. The floral illus­tra­tion needed to be brighter.

Phar­ma­ceu­tical labs and physi­cians were teaching women of repro­duc­tive age how to use their 28-day product each month. The labs couldn’t package the pills loosely in large quan­ti­ties – – each pill for the month had to be punched out in sequence from a card with a thin foil backing. The style of the dispensers, that held the cards, varied from one “brand” of pill to the next.
Promoting the style of the plastic dispenser was empha­sized to the Syntex product repre­sen­ta­tives that called on the physi­cians who would write the prescrip­tions for their patients.

Here are 10 of 72 images from a slide presen­ta­tion to Brevicon reps promoting Brevicon and the pill holder — in compar­ison to competing brands.

(Why did I only show men as doctors? My mother had a woman doctor, way back when I was born !)

The Wallette was a discreet cover for the pill dispenser. For the 5‑view layout, I acci­den­tally rendered one of the female hands darker than the others. It was a lucky error because that caused a discus­sion to choose, for this file folder, a hand-model with a tan– to suggest patients were other than white females.

In 1974, Syntex and other medical prod­ucts moved from Klemptner Casey to J. Walter Thompson and later from JWT to an agency named Barnum Commu­ni­ca­tions (with Bob Buechert at each move).
In 1975, I began free-lancing at Barnum Commu­ni­ca­tions (owner Jim Barnum was of the circus family). JWT had filed legal action for moving Syntex prod­ucts to his agency, newly located at 560 Pacific Avenue, SF.
Time went by, there were even “law-suit” ballads composed by the musi­cally inclined who worked at Barnum Commu­ni­ca­tions. Finally JWT settled. The case was dropped when Mr. Barnum agreed to “cease and desist working in the West”. That left about seven of the agency founders to inherit all of the clients.
1977 there was a move to 901 Battery Street with the new name Vicom Asso­ciates. After another move to One Lombard Street, a few years passed and it was acquired by Foote, Cone & Belding Health­care as Vicom / FCB.
Shown below: Two sections, of a 6‑page, 1992 Vicom / FCB Anniver­sary Party Report. I didn’t know of these parties, but was asked to illus­trate this one. (My illus­tra­tion of “The VICOM Culture” was flopped hori­zon­tally before printing, causing the “initial V” to look strange. The last three show: my window, my work­space and my parking space on the roof (just my car, another week-end dead­line).

One Lombard was my last San Fran­cisco loca­tion.
( Follow0up: So how many other prod­ucts, housed in plastic, did I promote? I’ll have to check back. But who even knew at that time, that one-use-plastics were piling up?)
Ann Thompson

Jack Allen — Ad Man + Photographer + Painter

Y&R New York As my old boss in New York used to say, “Where else can you have so much fun and get paid for it too”. Every morning I'd get on that Long Island train and head into New York. I usually got a place to sit from Levittown and I could get my sketches done and then I had a leisurely walk from Penn Station up to 39th and Madison. I could stay underground if it was raining. On a nice day it was beautiful. People watching and I got to see the latest Doyle Dane Bernbach's latest poster in the subway.

On a hot day it would be sweltering. There was no air conditioning in old 285. We would put towels under our arms to keep the sweat from ruining our drawing. Guerney Miller would pop in about 9:30. Guerney and I shared an office. He was our sketch artist and if our client demanded a more finished sketch Guerney was the man. At noon Guerney would bring out his guitar and have a jam session. That drew the music lovers.

When I went to New York, my uncle gave me three of his suits. He was a banker. Well, that’s how I looked, like a banker. Guerney made fun of me and took me down to J Press and got me a proper hat and of course a Brooks Brothers Suit and shoes to match. My wife would never let me hear the end of this. I must have worn that suit to bed.
One day I was sitting in the office I shared with Guerney, and Bob Hope walked in. I swear to god. Bob Hope.

He was doing some promo for the agency so the account executive thought he'd give the troops a thrill. What a thrill. We had a real conversation with him.
Later in life I met Bing Crosby and that kind of completed the two road boys.
It was strange being one on one with the stars of the galaxy like Irving Penn and Norman Rockwell. I never did get used to it.

A picture of yours truly in the headman's office in Y&R NY after we won the art director's award.
Of course the troops had to gather and it was all-new to the kid on the left.
Fred Sergenian 'Sarge' imagine telling him you were leaving Y&R and going back to California.
I still shudder. The guy on the right is Fred Papert, of Papert Koenig &Lewis fame to be.

There were 75 art directors at Y&R when I was there and a lettering man and a type-setter and a raft of production people and a little grey haired lady to usher the work through and three art buyers.
It was strange, but it worked just fine.
Telling my boss I was leaving was the most difficult thing I've ever done. I felt like a traitor. I still do.

San Francisco was warm and exciting. Foote, Cone & Belding was on the top floor of the Russ Building and when the wind blew the building swayed. I know because I worked there many nights.
The people in this story are Ford Sibly; head of office, George Richardson: head of S&W account team, Pete Peterson: Assistant Account Executive. George kept a bottle of booze in his desk for celebration and we managed to find a few times to celebrate. S&W let us run the show and we pushed it as far as we dared.

We got them to go with a full-page color ad in newspaper and got Herrero to design it. It won an award in the New York art directors annual. That made Joe Blumeline, our client, very happy. He felt he was getting his moneys worth. Meanwhile, Ford Sibly was sinking into alcoholism and head office was sending a new man out. Clients were scattering and heading for the door.
Honig-Cooper, sensing an opportunity, pounced on it.
I didn't like the idea of working for Honig-Cooper so I looked to Holst, Cumming & Myers, as they needed an Art Director. And they had a ton of Matson Lines work with two ships due to come on the South Pacific Route, and one more on the Hawaiian Route.

The map painted on the model’s forehead at the studio of Butte, Herrero and Hyde and then we rushed him to our studio and shot him.
We also did a photo shoot with two models to Hawaii and one of the models got measles and was confined to her cabin the whole trip so the other model had to carry double load. She was not happy
I worked day and night. When they turned the heat off in the building, I would take the drapes off the windows and catch a little sleep. It was fun work, designing menus and all sort of non-ad stuff.

Y&R San Francisco George Richardson invited me to his place in Novato. He was moving to Y&R (SF) and wanted me to come back to run the art department. I agreed since I was now, thru with Matson Lines. It's funny how the names kept changing on these agencies. Y&R was a great agency. Don Sternloff was head AD when I joined them and he was much loved by the troops. Which made me dog shit since the writing was on the wall.
I was teaching at the Academy of Art at night and I followed the old Art Center motto, drive them, hard. If they survived, they were keepers. I found two keepers: Mik Kitagawa and Dave Sanchez. I hired them.

Sternloff was let go and I was anointed. The agency had the number one show on the air, Maverick with James Garner as Maverick and that was pure gold in the advertising world. Plus we got Langendorf Bread and we turned Kaiser Industries loose on Mik and Dave. Our plates were full and we were completely busy DAY and NIGHT. Mik and Dave wondered what they had signed up for.
After a few years of this, it wears on you, and it wore on me. I developed an ulcer. I had told myself I would quit this business if I got sick, so I marched in and turned in my badge. They sent out an AD from NY, Mason Clark, and I went home to recoup. Now what do I do?

San Mateo Garage

Why don't I try photography? OK, I bought a Hasselblad and I was off. I got some models to pose for prints and rented a garage with a skylight in San Mateo. I cobbled a portfolio together and let it be known I was starving and got a call from Portland, Oregon. It was from my old friend, Pete Jenkins and it was work. Meyer and Frank wanted a series of NP ads hi-lighting M&F, full page too. I got a designer, Dick Snyder, and an Account Executive, Perry Leftwich –and I put a darkroom together in the garage. I hired models and when clothes arrived from Portland, we shot up a storm.

We designed ads and they wanted MORE. We were a hit. I had visions of forming an agency and we pitched Harrah's club. It went well and Bill Harrah wanted us but his ad manager got him to change his mind (the ad manager was afraid of losing his job) so we didn't get the account.
Dick Snyder had trouble with the free-lance world so we disbanded.
And Perry went back to salary.

M. Halberstadt Meanwhile, the photographer Milton Halberstadt invited me to lunch and suggested we might pool our talents. He had a beautiful studio in North Beach and I said yes, quicker than dirt.

At first we had fun—as Hal liked the sets he was so good at putting together—and I liked the people. So we fit well (Bank of America). And we enjoyed lunch at New Joes. And Hal was a Master Photographer so I was learning every day.

Chicago Rep, Jack Kapes Another thing fell out of the blue. Jack Kapes, an agent from Chicago. Jack was looking for photographers to represent. It seems Art Directors in Chicago would dearly love a trip to San Francisco to work with a San Francisco Photographer and get away from that Chicago cold.

And so it started. Leslie Salt Co, Cilux Paint, Champion Papers. They came out with their wives for a little vacation and of course we showed them the town. We were beat by the time they hauled anchor but richer by far and just like the Tea Trade, we had established a trade route. One of the fun ones I recall was when Pillsbury sent me to Jamaica and then I shot the cake at Hal's studio.

Vanderwater Studio As in many things, they don't always work as planned. Hal and I parted as friends and I moved to Vanderwater Street in my own studio, next to Veneto's Restaurant. Years of work came out this Studio.

More work in the very busy mid-1960s.

Eichler was a great one that got you a sure medal in the art show. Working with Sidjakov was such a pleasure. Pacific Telephone was another winner and putting Wally Summers in a phone booth as Superman, had to be my biggest thrill. Honig-Cooper surprised me when they hired me to shoot a Levi's series and the kids we hired turned out to be wonderful. One of the greatest AD's to work for was Hal Riney. You had to burn rubber as he was never satisfied but the work was superb and you could be very proud of it. The free ones were often the most exciting as the Christmas Card ad for BBD&O showing all their kids. It was like herding cats. But I loved it.

One Super Star that was champing at the bit was George Coutts. The Joseph Magnin AD had tons of talent. I had a few drinks with him on a late shoot one night and when I finally said good night and locked up, I went out to my car and dropped the keys in the street. I didn't see them so I got on my hands and knees and just then a police car came around the corner. He flashed the light on me. "Can I help you sir?" he said, ”I'm looking for my keys to my car”, I said. "You better not find them”, he said. One of the hazards of flying at night.

Sutter Street The Portland People at Dawson, Turner & Jenkins were putting pressure on me to start a branch of DT&J in San Francisco and sent a young fellow down to help in that endeavor. First we had to move to Downtown, Sutter Street. Then we had to get agency type furniture and all while photography was going on. Nude photography for Avon. I scoured the model files in SF but they were light on the right kind of nudes so I flew to Los Angeles, found a young lady that fit the bill and booked her. She arrived on a Monday and the clients arrived from Chicago and Sidjakov, the package designer arrived, and my assistants got to work and the young lady stripped. She had no modesty and said her parents were nudists and they had been that way as long as she could remember. We photographed uninterrupted.

Dawson Turner & Jenkins brought a political type pollster down to shake the tree on the Pete McCloskey race against Shirley Temple Black for Congress. He won. Again, I got a call from Dawson, Turner & Jenkins. They wanted a campaign of newspaper ads, full-page size.

Covering Meier and Frank’s “Jerry Frank” who was making a run for Governor. The success of this campaign led to an offer to move to Oregon and an “offer I couldn’t refuse”. The agency, Dawson, Turner & Jenkins, got swallowed up by Lennen & Newell, then somebody else, then Richardson, Seigle, Rolfs & McCoy became somebody else and Macy's bought out Meier & Frank–––and I started designing work for the Port of Vancouver:

and I figured it was time to retire.
By this time they had done a pretty good job of brainwashing on me as how beautiful Oregon was and I was resigned and my wife and I weren't getting along. (Old story) So we went.

Solo-ing It-In Oregon Tons of work. Had my own way, pretty much. Nice people.
Jk Gill’s, Oil Heat, Port of Vancouver, Blue Lake Green Beans.
Oregon. Oregon, what have I done? Left everything for the unknown. Politics, know the Governor, know the Senator, work on his campaign. Packwood's in trouble.
Work. Work. Jk Gill’s. A stationary store.  A big stationary store. Many stores. Why not give it a cluttered look. I found a young artist that had a great "busy" look and had him do an ad. Perfect. And Newspaper ads for Kasch's Nurseries. White Satin Sugar: A perfect place for Herrero to strut his stuff. As well as sweet photos.

Oil Heat Dealers. A collection of dealers in Oregon, Washington and Idaho that service and sell heating oil to homes in the Northwest. Reminder ads that are visible, aught to do it.

A rumble this summer by hippies threatened to spill into riots. I suggested we put up a series of billboards that say, "WAVE TO A COP TODAY" –and sponsor a music festival in McIver Park (a mile away from downtown). It worked. I was also involved with "lighting the bridges in Portland" which taught me "stay away from Architects". The things I did with Frank Farah at this time: we designed and Frank illustrated the walls of the Bend, Oregon Bus Station. Quite something, in Bend.

The sale of agencies was humongous. I never knew who was going to be my boss on Monday morning. It got to be a joke. My friend that started this whole thing, Dick Turner, had jumped off Suicide Bridge. And Pete Jenkins, his partner, had taken his ill-gotten gains and fled to Europe.
I became an account executive and married one of the Oil Dealers that I was fortune enough to stay married to for 46 years until she died last year.

William Cain Advertising I met Bill Cain on one of our Oil Heat trips to Hawaii and looked him up when I got back to Oregon. Bill was the owner of William Cain Advertising and had just had a revolt from his crew and they had walked away with his star account. Nike. He did have another account, Louisiana Pacific so he wasn't totally wiped out and he needed an art director. What the hell. We had a good time I still had Port of Vancouver, Bill had Louisiana Pacific, and everything swam along. Until Bill decided to sell the agency– including "my Port"–– to Gerber Advertising.

Gerber Advertising After the dust had cleared, I agreed to work for Gerber for 10 years (I actually worked for twelve) In that time I produced ads for Louisiana Pacific Windows and many other products.

Painting
I retired at 65 to paint
I said to myself, "what am I going to do with myself when I retire?"
"Paint"
"But I don't paint"
"Try"
So I tried. And my wife said, 'What are we going to do with all these paintings?"
I did 25 paintings a day.
"Paint slower"
I found a slow style. Wysoki
It was peaceful, fun and it was slow.
It took me a month to do a painting.
My wife said "good boy".
"Now let's get rid of this painting.
So I called a Jigsaw puzzle company and soon I was painting another one.
And another.
I've now done 96.
They rejected most for being too salty.
But happy wife, happy life

–that tuned in jigsaw puzzles.
Jigsaw Puzzles

Politics. That is what I would say most typifies Oregon. Small-town Politics.
I learned to love the people and the quirks and the laid back life.

Looking back I suppose what we did isn't so important but it sure was exciting and alive. We were making beautiful statements and bringing art and commerce together in a new, bold way.
We can be proud of the work we did and now that I'm out to pasture, I can see the work we did is so much superior to much that is done now because it mattered to us. Our 1/8 of an inch made all the difference in the world and was worth fighting for.

Thank you, Ann and Piet, for shining the light on the 50's and 60's.

Jack Allen

Editor’s Inclusions:

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I don't know if Jack remembers, but he called me at KPIX and offered me the job as AD at Y&R.( I was in his ad class at the Academy) I got Mik (Kitagawa) the Job at KPIX and told him about the offer, and if I don't get the job maybe you will. So I helped him pull his portfolio together and we both applied for the one job, on the same day, with Jack. We were so inexpensive he could hire us both for the same money.

Dave Sanchez


Writing That Gets Read.

What I miss most about the world of today’s adver­tising is the eye-catching, thought provoking Head­lines of the Golden Age.
I guess, Volk­swagen started a lot of it with one word, Lemon.
I am enclosing some ads here that I feel are exam­ples of what seems to be missing. My ego won’t allow me to tell you who wrote these ads but I will acknowl­edge the Art Direc­tors and Photog­ra­phers who played a big part in helping me create them.

Agency: McCann Erickson (San Fran­cisco)
1 Del Monte — Art Director: Jon Hyde; Photog­ra­pher: Ed Zak
2 YOSEMITE — Art director: Jon Hyde, Photog­ra­pher: John Muir
3 AIRPORT HILTON — Art Director: Jerry Leon­hart; Illus­trator: Chris Corey
4 SKIING AT YOSEMITE — Art Director: Jon Hyde; Illus­trator: Larry Duke
5 McNevin Cadillac — Art Director: Bruce Camp­bell
6 THINK. DON’T DRINK. — Art Director: Jon Hyde

Another quick tale:
I once did a B.A.R.T. poster for Master­Card and the head­line said;
Bay Area Rapid Trans­ac­tion.

Bart Poster

Adver­tiser: Master­Charge – San Fran­cisco
Adver­tising Mgr.: Rick Wynne
Agency: Foote, Cone & Belding / Honig – San Fran­cisco
Art Director: Kris English

It took up a wall in the BART stations. It won an Award so I asked photog­ra­pher Ed Zak for a copy of the poster. In typical Ed Zak style he said he would have to charge me $25. to make a copy. Zak was one of a kind.

Oh yeah…sure…put that photo in.
It’s the first one I’ve liked in about 20 years.

Todd Miller

POP and POS

In the years shown here, “Point Of Purchase” and “Point Of Sale” were the terms to describe the many items that made prod­ucts appealing, (Today the term: Point Of Sale or POS is widely defined as the process of purchasing the product or service.)

In the years of 1970 to 1975, I was able to touch on this area of marketing. From label and product designs to the promo pieces that brought atten­tion to the product in a store setting. These assign­ments gave me a sense of being there, greeting the customers. (I was young.)

The A. Carlisle & Co. of San Fran­cisco had the printing and construc­tion equip­ment to develop a variety of store displays. Carlisle’s creative direc­tors gave me — twelve assign­ments. Here are some exam­ples:

Shasta: In 1889 “Shasta” was known for the waters from the Mt. Shasta, CA region.

In the years after 1931 it was devel­oped into a ginger ale or soda and they were offered usually as a mix for alco­holic drinks. In the 1950s Shasta Cola became avail­able in cans. Oper­ating from their head­quar­ters in Hayward CA, the Shasta company was a nearby client for adver­tising assign­ments.

1970 Shasta Cola, Shelf-Talker. This was an unusual idea at that time – opaque inks printed on foil, with a die-cut. This was to show along with the Shasta Cola displayed on the market shelf.

C&H Sugar: (Cali­fornia and Hawaiian Sugar Company) As early as 1906, ships from Hawaii were sailing into San Fran­cisco Bay, then north­east through San Pablo Bay reaching the port of Crockett where they offloaded raw cane sugar. C&H today, produces 700,000 tons of sugar annu­ally. C&H was a steady client for San Fran­cisco ad agen­cies and printing compa­nies.

1971 C&H Sugar Hawaii (3‑D wire hangers). Here the request was to have two “Wire-Hangers” with two different scenes on each side (one showing daytime and the other side, night­time. Also there was a banner with the words: “LUAU LAND

1972 C&H Sugar (Wire Hangers). I first tried other rough ideas: an egg and bunny as a folded die-cut in an egg shape – – a little bunny – – a chicken – – then two layouts preceded the final five wire-hangers.

1973-Elec­tric & Gas Indus­tries Asso­ci­a­tionEIGA. Orig­i­nally head­quar­tered in San Fran­cisco, with roots from the early 1930s, EGIA began as a nonprofit member­ship asso­ci­a­tion with the mission to help promote the sale of energy-efficient appli­ances for retailers throughout the state of Cali­fornia. EIGA is now located in Sacra­mento, CA.

1973: Clorox’s Liquid-plumr

Liquid-plumr” made by Clorox with head­quar­ters in Oakland CA, was another regional client. Not having a color Xerox in those years, I show these four exam­ples in b/w. The one chosen was to be rendered as finished art, printed and then placed in markets near the product.

The large wine industry in Cali­fornia gave the Carlisle Company many oppor­tu­ni­ties of displaying a variety of displays and bins that would hold many bottles and have photographs portraying an elegant display of the wines.

1973: Inglenook wine was founded in Ruther­ford, Cali­fornia during 1879 by Gustave Niebaum, a Finnish sea captain.

This Inglenook page of layouts offered the client a choice of photo­graphic settings. The clients would choose the mood that they wanted displayed and a photog­ra­pher would follow the basic “look” and be the one to choose all of the elements for the “table-top” setting. The chosen “look” is shown also.

1973: Chilean Wines. Carlisle’s client, here, might have been a company dealing mostly with wines imported into San Fran­cisco Bay. It might have been the begin­ning of the San Fran­cisco Wine Trading Company. (I have no other source.) For this assign­ment, we offered many choices of subjects for the “feel” of a Chilean vine­yard. Two of the subjects were devel­oped.

1973: One of Cali­for­nia’s oldest and most renowned wineries, Geyser Peak Winery was founded in 1880 by Augustus Quitzow, a pioneer in Alexander Valley wine­making,

1974: POP concepts for imported BABYSHAM.

1973 – 1974: Anna­corré. I don’t have notes on this display sheet as to who brought this job to us, nor the name of the parent winery. I cannot find any infor­ma­tion about this wine, on line.

United Vint­ners Starting in 1975 I got a number of assign­ments from United Vint­ners, usually through ad agen­cies such as McCann Erickson. Some assign­ments were also for maga­zine ads, and posters for Guild Brandy. A “warm-up” jacket was offered.

How many ways can you offer a wood wine-rack for $22.00?

For Inglenook, these b&w copies were Magic Marker color sketches to show eleven ways to make that offer on their in-store display bins.

This other (folded) display layout was to be placed behind a collec­tion of Inglenook bottles.

United Vint­ners, in those days, also had the three TJ Swann ($1.75) fruit wines: Easy Nights, Mellow Days, and After Hours. These are no longer avail­able in markets. This “Dial a Wine” was to be attached to the refrig­er­ated cases that held these wines. The turn of the dial to 15 descrip­tive sentences, would offer the suggested fruit wine for each occa­sion!

This was one of three strange assign­ments, so far in my career. (The first was the pack­aging of meal­worms for fishing. (“Mighty Mealys” was a previous story.) The other was for a J. Walter Thompson client: Shakey’s Pizza. They planned a Christmas P.O.P. poster showing a slice of pizza with the Shakey’s logo as the star on the top. 7‑Up was an addi­tional product to show – so bottle caps were orna­ments and the 7‑Up bottle was the trunk of the tree. (I’ve tried to forget that assign­ment.)

Browne Vint­ners

Paul Masson (1859 – 1940) emigrated from Burgundy, France to Cali­fornia in 1878. In 1892 he devel­oped his first sparkling wine. Masson even­tu­ally became known as the “Cham­pagne King of Cali­fornia”.

Late 1970s: David Reid, creative director at Browne Vint­ners, planned that this poster for Paul Masson wines to be, actu­ally, a P.O.P.!

The artist, Dick Moore, said that it was offered FREE– as a “tear-off-sheet”.

ADASF 1958 – 1971

Here is a collec­tion of designs accepted in the annual exhi­bi­tions of the Art Direc­tors and Artists Club of San Fran­cisco. Point Of Purchase aka: Point Of Sale.

One might ques­tion how a large outdoor board could be a point of sale. The two “OK” boards, in the ‘70s, were place at the side of the large Chevrolet lots selling “OK” approved used cars. Too bad, that the annuals were only in black and white. (I had one color example, so I added it.

The many San Fran­cisco Bay Area graphic artists and art studios — had steady sources of employ­ment. Reviewing all of these exam­ples from the few years shown, I wonder how the POP industry is oper­ating now. Do artists still have the freedom to develop and render various choices for the client, printing shops, or ad agen­cies – – still with markers or what?

Ann Thompson