POP and POS

In the years shown here, “Point Of Purchase” and “Point Of Sale” were the terms to describe the many items that made prod­ucts appealing, (Today the term: Point Of Sale or POS is widely defined as the process of purchasing the product or service.)

In the years of 1970 to 1975, I was able to touch on this area of marketing. From label and product designs to the promo pieces that brought atten­tion to the product in a store setting. These assign­ments gave me a sense of being there, greeting the customers. (I was young.)

The A. Carlisle & Co. of San Fran­cisco had the printing and construc­tion equip­ment to develop a variety of store displays. Carlisle’s creative direc­tors gave me — twelve assign­ments. Here are some exam­ples:

Shasta: In 1889 “Shasta” was known for the waters from the Mt. Shasta, CA region.

In the years after 1931 it was devel­oped into a ginger ale or soda and they were offered usually as a mix for alco­holic drinks. In the 1950s Shasta Cola became avail­able in cans. Oper­ating from their head­quar­ters in Hayward CA, the Shasta company was a nearby client for adver­tising assign­ments.

1970 Shasta Cola, Shelf-Talker. This was an unusual idea at that time – opaque inks printed on foil, with a die-cut. This was to show along with the Shasta Cola displayed on the market shelf.

C&H Sugar: (Cali­fornia and Hawaiian Sugar Company) As early as 1906, ships from Hawaii were sailing into San Fran­cisco Bay, then north­east through San Pablo Bay reaching the port of Crockett where they offloaded raw cane sugar. C&H today, produces 700,000 tons of sugar annu­ally. C&H was a steady client for San Fran­cisco ad agen­cies and printing compa­nies.

1971 C&H Sugar Hawaii (3‑D wire hangers). Here the request was to have two “Wire-Hangers” with two different scenes on each side (one showing daytime and the other side, night­time. Also there was a banner with the words: “LUAU LAND

1972 C&H Sugar (Wire Hangers). I first tried other rough ideas: an egg and bunny as a folded die-cut in an egg shape – – a little bunny – – a chicken – – then two layouts preceded the final five wire-hangers.

1973-Elec­tric & Gas Indus­tries Asso­ci­a­tionEIGA. Orig­i­nally head­quar­tered in San Fran­cisco, with roots from the early 1930s, EGIA began as a nonprofit member­ship asso­ci­a­tion with the mission to help promote the sale of energy-efficient appli­ances for retailers throughout the state of Cali­fornia. EIGA is now located in Sacra­mento, CA.

1973: Clorox’s Liquid-plumr

Liquid-plumr” made by Clorox with head­quar­ters in Oakland CA, was another regional client. Not having a color Xerox in those years, I show these four exam­ples in b/w. The one chosen was to be rendered as finished art, printed and then placed in markets near the product.

The large wine industry in Cali­fornia gave the Carlisle Company many oppor­tu­ni­ties of displaying a variety of displays and bins that would hold many bottles and have photographs portraying an elegant display of the wines.

1973: Inglenook wine was founded in Ruther­ford, Cali­fornia during 1879 by Gustave Niebaum, a Finnish sea captain.

This Inglenook page of layouts offered the client a choice of photo­graphic settings. The clients would choose the mood that they wanted displayed and a photog­ra­pher would follow the basic “look” and be the one to choose all of the elements for the “table-top” setting. The chosen “look” is shown also.

1973: Chilean Wines. Carlisle’s client, here, might have been a company dealing mostly with wines imported into San Fran­cisco Bay. It might have been the begin­ning of the San Fran­cisco Wine Trading Company. (I have no other source.) For this assign­ment, we offered many choices of subjects for the “feel” of a Chilean vine­yard. Two of the subjects were devel­oped.

1973: One of Cali­for­nia’s oldest and most renowned wineries, Geyser Peak Winery was founded in 1880 by Augustus Quitzow, a pioneer in Alexander Valley wine­making,

1974: POP concepts for imported BABYSHAM.

1973 – 1974: Anna­corré. I don’t have notes on this display sheet as to who brought this job to us, nor the name of the parent winery. I cannot find any infor­ma­tion about this wine, on line.

United Vint­ners Starting in 1975 I got a number of assign­ments from United Vint­ners, usually through ad agen­cies such as McCann Erickson. Some assign­ments were also for maga­zine ads, and posters for Guild Brandy. A “warm-up” jacket was offered.

How many ways can you offer a wood wine-rack for $22.00?

For Inglenook, these b&w copies were Magic Marker color sketches to show eleven ways to make that offer on their in-store display bins.

This other (folded) display layout was to be placed behind a collec­tion of Inglenook bottles.

United Vint­ners, in those days, also had the three TJ Swann ($1.75) fruit wines: Easy Nights, Mellow Days, and After Hours. These are no longer avail­able in markets. This “Dial a Wine” was to be attached to the refrig­er­ated cases that held these wines. The turn of the dial to 15 descrip­tive sentences, would offer the suggested fruit wine for each occa­sion!

This was one of three strange assign­ments, so far in my career. (The first was the pack­aging of meal­worms for fishing. (“Mighty Mealys” was a previous story.) The other was for a J. Walter Thompson client: Shakey’s Pizza. They planned a Christmas P.O.P. poster showing a slice of pizza with the Shakey’s logo as the star on the top. 7‑Up was an addi­tional product to show – so bottle caps were orna­ments and the 7‑Up bottle was the trunk of the tree. (I’ve tried to forget that assign­ment.)

Browne Vint­ners

Paul Masson (1859 – 1940) emigrated from Burgundy, France to Cali­fornia in 1878. In 1892 he devel­oped his first sparkling wine. Masson even­tu­ally became known as the “Cham­pagne King of Cali­fornia”.

Late 1970s: David Reid, creative director at Browne Vint­ners, planned that this poster for Paul Masson wines to be, actu­ally, a P.O.P.!

The artist, Dick Moore, said that it was offered FREE– as a “tear-off-sheet”.

ADASF 1958 – 1971

Here is a collec­tion of designs accepted in the annual exhi­bi­tions of the Art Direc­tors and Artists Club of San Fran­cisco. Point Of Purchase aka: Point Of Sale.

One might ques­tion how a large outdoor board could be a point of sale. The two “OK” boards, in the ‘70s, were place at the side of the large Chevrolet lots selling “OK” approved used cars. Too bad, that the annuals were only in black and white. (I had one color example, so I added it.

The many San Fran­cisco Bay Area graphic artists and art studios — had steady sources of employ­ment. Reviewing all of these exam­ples from the few years shown, I wonder how the POP industry is oper­ating now. Do artists still have the freedom to develop and render various choices for the client, printing shops, or ad agen­cies – – still with markers or what?

Ann Thompson